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Archive for April 25th, 2012

“When I lived in Vienna, I’d cross the Reichsbrücke every day and look over at the United Nations complex. I thought it’d make for a great setting for the abduction of the G-10 leaders. Coupling that image with today’s global religious, political, and financial situations, I developed the motivation for The Prophet’s Alibi,” says Korzep.

Humanity watches as chaos surrounds the modern world, markets crumble, and society struggles with their unsure future. The fate of the helpless world leaders now rests in the hands of a money hungry, political extremist group, who will stop at nothing to satisfy their ravenous greed. Up against the unpredictable and dangerous mind of a terrorist known only as “the Prophet,” Sylvia must rely on her militant training, quick thinking, and fearless commitment to rescue the G-10 and save the world from the brink of disaster.

About the book:

The President of the United States has been abducted.

While meeting with other world leaders in a unified Europe of the future, President Marge Haydon is among the members of the elite G-10 taken captive by militants who crash a peaceful inaugural luncheon. The terrorists, led by a mysterious man called the Prophet, now have control of some of the most powerful people in the world.

Sylvia Jensen is President Haydon’s personal assistant. She is a child of the new millennium, trained in anti-terrorism and modern combat. Whether it’s mere fate or divine intervention that puts her in the right place at the right time, she may be the world’s only chance at a peaceful resolution. But even Jensen can’t be sure who she’s up against in the gray area of foreign relations, and no-body knows the identity of the Prophet.

Jensen finds herself up against a power-hungry threesome who has already amassed almost seven percent of the world’s gold re-serves. These men want more, though, and now lives are at stake in the name of domination and greed. The world must watch and wait as world leaders suffer hours of terror and the world approaches the brink of disaster.

Author’s bio:

Timothy Korzep was raised with a Wall Street Journal in his hands. He soon began to work beside an elite core of fund managers, market strategists, and analysts, enabling him to navigate the often-intimidating financial field. His work took him to an impressive collection of cities such as London, Paris, Milan, Munich, and Hong Kong, which inspired the backdrop for The Prophet’s Alibi. Having published two previous books, Final Approval and The Kondratieff Crisis, he continues to pursue his passion for writing and currently lives in California.

Link to excerpt: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000509353/The-Prophets-Alibi.aspx

Link to purchase page: http://www.amazon.com/The-Prophets-Alibi-Timothy-Korzep/dp/1469737019

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Getting Out of Dodge City, Heading for L.A. on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe is a short novel that reads like a memoir and that will appeal to those interested in black American history and the dynamics of poor black American families from the early 1800s to the 1960s.

The story begins in 1821 with our narrator talking about the origins of the Atchinson, Topeka and the Santa Fe railroads, how they replaced the old Santa Fe Trail, and the impact they had on the people of Dodge City, Kansas. Author Clifton E. Marsh describes the city as “the dust bowl queen of America,” a dry place where “the wind and sand blew so hard a man could catch sand pneumonia.” It is in the heart of this city where our narrator’s family come from, starting with General Burnie, the imposing grandfather who was a laborer at the railroad. The tale spans three generations, from the grandfather to his beautiful daughter Marguerite who eventually moves to Los Angeles and marries Clifton, to her two sons, Jesse and Hugo, born from different fathers and who both live different painful lives that reflect the lives of other Black men during the 50s and 60s. Homelessness, street gangs, sexual and drug abuse are just some of the subjects explored in this story. 

Because it has lots of narration and exposition and very little dialogue, Getting Out of Dodge City, Heading for L.A. on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe reads more like a memoir than a novel. I was a bit put off by several punctuation mistakes and by the use of purple prose in some love scenes, but on the whole, this is a poignant, honest and heartfelt account about a black family trying to survive and improve their lives in the midst of a decaying society that is full of obstacles. 

This review originally appeared in Blogcritics Magazine.

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