Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June 11th, 2014

399785_Personalized-Banner-Ad-without-ebook_L1

 


Amanda Perfectly MadeTitle:
 Amanda, Perfectly Made
Author: Laurel Rausch Greshel
Publisher: iUniverse
Pages: 211
Genre: Religion/Inspirational
Format: Kindle

Purchase at AMAZON

On August 1, 1983, Laurel Greshel’s world changed forever after a phone call from her doctor. After receiving word that her unborn baby had serious health issues, Laurel was overwhelmed. As she and her husband, Ted, struggled to accept the diagnosis that their daughter, Amanda, would be born with spina bifida, they had to slowly learn to say goodbye to “normal” and embrace each of their tiny newborn’s accomplishments.

Without any instruction book on how to raise a child with spina bifida, Laurel and Ted must learn to survive countless medical issues and several near-death scares with Amanda by leaning on their faith in God. As Laurel candidly shares experiences—both good and bad—that she has with doctors, nurses, teachers, family members, and friends, she offers a heartfelt glimpse into her painful struggles as she gives entirely of herself to help Amanda grow to her full potential. With the help of God’s steady hand, Laurel manages to raise two other daughters, nurture her marriage, and cope with all the ups and downs of caring for a medically challenged child.

In this poignant memoir, one mother describes her unforgettable journey through her daughter’s difficulties, revealing the important message that God creates all of us just the way He wants us— perfectly made.

 

amazon

Laurel Rausch Greshel grew up in Parma, Ohio, and later moved to southeastern Michigan, where she and her husband, Ted, raised three daughters. It is through her faith that Laurel faced and survived the challenges of raising her eldest daughter, Amanda, who was born with spina bifida.

 

Laurel is giving away a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

645

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive one $25 Amazon Gift Certificate or Paypal Cash.
  • This giveaway begins June 2 and ends on June 14.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on Monday, June 16.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Read Full Post »

378606_Personalized-Banner-Ad_L1

 

 


Dear mom and dadTitle: 
Dear Mom and Dad
Author: Georgia Lee McGowen
Publisher: iUniverse
Pages: 290
Genre: Biography
Format: Kindle

Purchase at AMAZON

Much has been written both about and by people who feel they were assigned the wrong body at conception, exploring the struggles and too often the tragedies that result from that mismatch of nature. Very little has been written, however, to chronicle the lifelong struggle of people to understand and come to terms with two distinct sets of emotions, one male and one female – a single soul, at times divided, at times united, by two clearly identifiable spirits.

Dear Mom and Dad: You Don’t Know Me, But … traces the life of George through the eyes of Georgia, the female half of their soul, from early childhood in the post war Texas oil fields through the innocence of his early school years in northeastern Oklahoma. With the onset of puberty, Georgia watches the omnipresent feeling of not being normal cast a destructive pall over nearly everything George attempts. After the collapse of his lifelong dream, George begins again with hopes, new dreams and the love they’ve both longed for. Georgia finally emerges, but understanding her part in their soul comes slowly and is complicated by a tragedy of profound proportion.

Dear Mom and Dad considers the ultimate understanding of God’s will for both George and Georgia and its unusual conclusion, sharing a story of struggle and self-acceptance.

 

amazon

 

Georgia McGowen spent thirty years in George’s subconscious while they both struggled to understand the meaning of their dual nature and another twenty-five years learning to live with their distinct differences. They are retired together as Georgia in Mesa, AZ.

 

Georgia is giving away a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

645

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive one $25 Amazon Gift Certificate or Paypal Cash.
  • This giveaway begins June 2 and ends on June 14.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on Monday, June 16.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Read Full Post »

Karai MadillA chronic “head in the cloudser” K. Madill lives in a rickety house on a well treed street in British Columbia, Canada.  When she’s not hanging out with her best equine friend in the woods she can be found trying to stay upright on her roller skates or mediating the affairs of her various furred and feathered friends that rule the aforementioned rickety house. 

K. Madill’s website: kmadill.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/K-Madill/161159890706088

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KaraiMadill1  

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20643483-the-stolen-herd

About the book

Mandamus is only a foal when his herd is captured by the terrible Rakhana Army. Rescued and raised in secrecy, he knows nothing of his heritage until a dreadful incident in the woods brings him to the attention of the Forest council – and everyone else. Sent away for his own protection, he is determined to seek help on behalf of the many animals who have gone missing from the forest, including his own family.

With the help of a troubled man and a stout-hearted bat, can Mandamus save his fellow creatures before it’s too late?

Purchase on Amazon

Interview

Would you call yourself a born writer?  

Storyteller, yes…writer, no.  I’ve been making up stories for as long as I can remember. I used to try and get my pets to act out parts I’d written for them. Talk about bedlam!  None of them were trained. We all had creative differences.  Needless to say, I gave up on being a playwright and turned to short stories and then novels.  The Stolen Herd is my first book and, let me tell you, writing it was like being lost in the wilderness.   I had no idea where I was going or what I was doing.

What was your inspiration for The Stolen Herd?

I clearly saw my main character, Mandamus, standing before me one day. He had this really troubled look on his face. The Stolen Herd was carved out of a stack of notes that took me about three years to create. The novel itself took six years, but that’s because a whole lot of life happened during that time.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

Ohhh, this is my favorite question! I began the series to write about animal rights, equality for human beings and environmentalism.  Yeah, nothing too heavy there!

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

Six years. I’m a relentless planner/rewriter/agonizer.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I can be disciplined but only if I have a deadline, seriously – I’m terrible at keeping up a writing routine.  Truthfully, I’m terrible at keeping up any kind of routine. A good writing day will find me putting in about 10 hours of work, broken up by taking care of my horse, ferrets, dogs, cats, turtles and fish. That’s on a weekend. During the week, I do all of that, plus work a full time job, so I don’t get lots of scribe time. I have no writing space at my house so sometimes I’m reduced to finding the nearest closet and scribbling madly in there for an hour or two.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

I think stripping layers off of myself was hard.  I chose Mandamus to be raised by another herd and I’m adopted so, you know…some of it is quite personal.  Some of the great qualities my characters have come from me and, unfortunately, some of the nasty traits do as well.

What do you love most about being an author?

Love most? Hmmm…let’s see. Living in a different world, not being able to relate to most people? Not being able to hold my own at a party where people are discussing mortgage rates or the deficit because I’m too busy thinking about how a grizzly bear, a cougar and a man could break a tribe of Yeti out of prison? Those are the definite downsides.   I suppose what I love best is being able to write that nonsense down and share it with people who are drawn to that sort of thing.

Where can we find you on the web?

kmadill.com

or on Facebook under K. Madill

Pump Up Your Book and K. Madill are teaming up to give away a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

Terms and conditions:

    • By entering, you confirm you are 18 years of age or older.
    • Raffle runs from 12:00 AM EST on June 2 through 12:00 AM EST on June 28, 2014.
    • Winner will be selected randomly by Rafflecopter.
    • Winner will be notified by email and has 72 hours to claim the prize before a new winner is selected.
    • Prize will be sent via email from the author’s representative.
    • VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Read Full Post »

Eliot BakerEliot Baker lives in Finland. He teaches communications at a local college and runs an editing and translating business, but would be content singing for his heavy metal band and writing novels full-time. He grew up near Seattle, got his B.A. in World Literature at PitzerCollege, and got his M.S. in Science Journalism from BostonUniversity. He was an award-winning journalist at the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror, and before that he wrote for the Harvard Health Letters. He spent four years pursuing a career in the sciences while at the HarvardExtensionSchool, during which time he spun old people in NASA-designed rocket chairs and kept younger people awake for 86 hours at a time in a sleep deprivation study. He likes good books, all music, and bad movies, and believes music and literature snobs just need a hug.

His latest book is the supernatural thriller/historical mystery, The Last Ancient.

Visit his blog at www.eliotbakerauthor.blogspot.com.

About the Book:

The Last Ancient 2Around NantucketIsland, brutal crime scenes are peppered with ancient coins, found by the one man who can unlock their meaning. But what do the coins have to do with the crimes? Or the sudden disease epidemic? Even the creature? And who–or what–left them?

The answer leads reporter Simon Stephenson on a journey through ancient mythology, numismatics, and the occult. Not to mention his own past, which turns out to be even darker than he’d realized; his murdered father was a feared arms dealer, after all. Along the way, Simon battles panic attacks and a host of nasty characters — some natural, others less so — while his heiress fiancee goes bridezilla, and a gorgeous rival TV reporter conceals her own intentions.

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Writing is in my blood. My mother, Sharon Baker, published three science fiction novels in the 1980s before she passed away. Growing up, I loved going to writer’s conferences and sci-fi conventions and meeting authors. I’d like to think that my writing passion is completely my own. Writing gives me deep personal satisfaction, and at times I can get full-on writer’s high. My brain is wired to feel happy when I’m writing. I love it. But I’m sure there was plenty of nurture in addition to my writer’s nature.

What was your inspiration for THE LAST ANCIENT?

My inspiration for The Last Ancient started off as something darker than the final product. Some people very close to me were having their lives ripped apart by addiction, and I began writing a parable about that downward spiral. Then I basically went down a creative rabbit hole myself, found some incredible stuff, recorded it, and realized the story I needed to tell was a much different tale than the one I’d intended. It would be more personal. I’d just quit my job as a reporter on Nantucket and moved to Finland to raise a family with my Finnish wife. Having given up career and country to make the move, I felt stuck between two worlds, living in one but missing the other. Staring out my office window at the pale winter sunlight, I suddenly thought back to our former home on the island. I got homesick. I recalled one of my first field assignments as a reporter where I’d shadowed a deer hunter at sunrise, and how amidst a chorus of shotgun blasts the red island sun rose over the cold, windswept island. I remembered seeing truckloads of dead deer at the weigh-in station, and some illegally butchered carcasses discarded on pristine trails and beaches. Looking back down at my laptop, out of nowhere, I typed, “Shotguns crow across Nantucket.” The Finnish sunlight outside just seemed to turn golden. A gateway to this darkly fantastic Nantucket opened. It was a pivotal moment.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I’m drawn to growth and transformation, be it for better or for worse, literal or metaphorical. The Last Ancient became what it is once alchemy came into the picture. Alchemy is a three-thousand-year-old study into transforming base elements into precious ones, especially gold. It’s about finding immortality and godhood, via the Philosopher’s Stone. We’ve all read or seen Harry Potter. But have you read C.G. Jung’s work on alchemy and symbolism? Jung, I discovered, was obsessed with how neatly alchemical processes and symbology aligned with his own theories on the transformative states of man. He found that, like alchemists with metals, people were trying to turn their own base elements into gold, to become better, to become gods, immortal. He’s a pretty far-out guy in his own right, owning some legitimate claims to mystical abilities. I looked at his work and held it up against the ancient works of Hermes Trismegistus and then the much bloodier stuff of the some ancient alchemists and started playing with the literal and figurative interplay of the transformative process, of becoming something more, as an individual or as part of a relationship or a community. My original working title was, Until a God You Become; but my publisher said, Sounds Like Yoda It Does. And they were probably right.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

The first draft took me about six months of on-again-off-again writing. The next two drafts took another six months, but those re-drafts were pretty heavy, requiring tons of changes and even more intensive writing. I kicked off writing The Last Ancient by holing up in a secluded cabin in the woods of Finland in October, 2011. I pitched it at the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association conference in July, 2012, got a bunch of manuscript requests, and submitted my re-draft in February, 2013. Champagne Book Group accepted it in April, 2013, and it was published in December, 2013. So that was my timeline for it.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I wish I were more disciplined. My typical writing day begins with shoving my two kids into their clothes and dragging them to daycare. Then I return home, and take care of whatever business I must. I start writing or researching around 9 AM. I try to devote specific days for writing or for research, because research is important to me and writing requires an uninterrupted block of time. It can take me two hours of plunking at the keys before the world gets vivid and the characters start speaking to me. My wife is very supportive, and every so often I’ll get a long writing weekend at the cabin or home alone. Those writing vacations are vital. I’ll type for sixteen hours at a time. I prefer to write obsessively. By the end of the weekend I’m talking to myself and my eyes are wild and my hair is disheveled. I’m basically a crazy person. But that’s when the writing really crackles.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Remember how Keanu Reeves had to first decide which pill to take to enter the Matrix? And once he’d made that decision, he then had to learn how to fight and fly and teleport and choose the perfect black leather-and-sunglasses ensemble? Writing The Last Ancient was kind of like that: swallowing the pill was pretty easy, but dealing with the consequences was really hard, requiring tons of effort and training that were absolutely necessary and infinitely rewarding.

I knew my story required a complex conspiracy, but I’d never designed a mystery before, much less one involving mythology, peak resource theory, alchemy, and history. At times I felt like I was juggling flaming machetes. So much research, so many interlocking subplots and historical anecdotes. And yet the characters always spoke to me and the story always flowed. I rarely got burned or cut and never dropped the blades. How? I found the sweet-spot between hard research and outlining, and creative release. You see, I’m a natural pantser who’s reformed into an outliner. I’d set aside days – sometimes weeks – for research and outlining, while dedicating other time blocks for hard-core writing, often in a secluded cabin away from all my soul-sucking electrical gadgetry. Cliché, yes, but it worked. Folks, once you’ve done your internet research, dropkick your tablets and bury an axe in your TV. When it’s just you and the rapping of your keyboard, amazing things will happen.

What do you love most about being an author?

Knowing at the cellular level who and what I am, and being proud of it. While writing is a craft, some people are just naturally wired for that craft. I discovered my write-sided brain upon finding that writing yields a bigger rush than almost anything else–at least anything that can be done legally, in public, fully clothed, and on a daily basis. Writers write because they have to. It’s an obsession and an addiction. Life is joy when writing is involved, and dull when it’s not. Also, you’re never too old to write. It’s a dream that can never die. A writer always has hope. They’re never failing but always developing.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I went the small press route. I didn’t really consider self-publishing because I don’t have the social platform to make that a successful option, and because I really wanted the validation of being accepted by a house and having a great editor, which I received in Nikki Andrews. I pitched my novel at the Pacific Northwest Writers Association in 2012, and got interest from some New York agents and indie publishers. BURST Books was the one house who wanted my book as-is, no substantial changes please, and they praised my writing and story right off. The larger houses were worried the book was too long and combined too many genres. I went with the house that believed in me. And have they ever. They named The Last Ancient Novel of the Year for their Champagne Book Group Annual Author Awards. I’m honored.

Where can we find you on the web?

My blog is eliotbakerauthor.blogspot.com. Follow me on twitter @eliotebaker. My website is coming, stay tuned!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: