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Archive for June, 2017

ABOUT THE BOOK:
 
 
THE DEVIL’S GIFT by best-selling author Laura Landon is one
of twenty-five titles—all historical romance—that all carry the Union Jack
Heart. Featured authors also include Christina McKnight, Ava Stone, Deb
Marlowe, Meara Platt, Julie Johnstone, and more!
Romance, deception, murder…happily
ever afters you won’t want to miss. Look for titles that carry the Union Jack
Heart.

Publication date: June 25th,
2017

Genre: Victorian Romance
 
Jackson Rafferty, second son of the eleventh Earl
of Devlin, held his dying brother in his arms and swore he’d avenge his murder.
That pact made in blood led him to the back halls of Kingston Manor and the
woman who would stand between him and pursuing the man Jack knew had killed his
brother. That man was her father.

 

Miss Jenevieve Kingston has a secret. Keeping it is the only thing
keeping her father alive. When a rogue by the name of Jack Dawson comes
dangerously close to spoiling everything, Jenna forces him from her home. But
not before he has worked his way into her heart.

Now he’s back, proving he is not who she thought he was. But how can she trust
him after weeks of deception?

 

EXCERPT:
“It’s rather funny, don’t you
think?” the Earl of Devlin said as he continued to make his way down the
street. “Father thought if you were gone, I would step in to take your place.
He thought your absence would make me assume some responsibility in running
Devlin Downs. Instead…”
“Instead, what?” Jack asked, feeling
more uncomfortable by the second.
When Sheridan stopped on the
sidewalk and turned, Jack felt a cold chill race down his spine. The color left
his brother’s bronzed face and a haunted look filled his eyes.
“Refusing to marry Kingston’s
daughter is probably the first selfless act I’ve ever committed.”
“How can you say that?”
Shad paused and Jack knew his
brother was weighing how much he should reveal.
“How much do you know about
Kingston?”
“Very little. I only know about the
agreement he made with Father for you to marry his daughter.”
“A pact made in blood,” Shad said
barely loud enough to be heard. “Marrying into that family would have condemned
us all. Or worse.”
“What are you talking about? If
there’s something we should go to the authorities with—“
Shad dropped his head back and
laughed. “The authorities. Oh, that’s rich, Jack. You’ve been in government
service too long. The authorities are the last ones you can trust.”
“That’s not true, Shad. I have
connections that have nothing to do with the local authorities. Tell me what
you know and I’ll figure out what to do.”
The Earl of Devlin smiled sadly at
his brother. “You always could fix everything. I should have known to come to
you right away.”
“Yes, you should have. Now, what do
you know?”
Sheridan hesitated as if knowing
what he was about to do was the same as stepping off a ledge. Once you took the
first step, there was no going back.
“Promise you’ll be careful, Jack. I
don’t know all the details. In fact, I’m confused on some of them, but somehow
the Kingston name is behind it.”
“Behind what?”
“Behind—”
A nondescript carriage clattered
noisily by on the far side of the street. A few yards further on a drunken trio
assaulted a familiar tune. Shad’s words halted abruptly. At the same moment
Jack saw the surprised look on Shad’s face he heard a muffled pop and knew
instantly what was happening. In horror he saw Shad’s features sag as he
crumpled to the ground in front of him.
Jack threw his body over Shad but no
second shot came. Jack cautiously lifted his head and looked around. In the
faint light he focused on the area from which he felt the shot had come. All
was quiet. The street was empty.
Jack knew that even if he left his
brother to race after the assassin, he wouldn’t find anyone. Whoever had shot
Shad was long gone.
“Shad, how badly are you hit?” Jack
asked, kneeling beside his brother. “Can you—”
Jack stopped. He was going to ask if
he was able to stand, or if Jack should send for a doctor. But he knew the
answer. Shad couldn’t stand. And it was already too late to send for a doctor.
Shad was dying.
“Hold on, Shad. I’ll take care of
you.”
Shad lifted his trembling hand and
pulled Jack down to whisper.
“Don’t let…”
Shad coughed through the rattle in
his throat.
“…get you…
“…too.”

 

Buy now
on Amazon!
http://a.co/4XPaOjx
This book is free for Kindle Unlimited
readers.

 

ENTER TO WIN:
 

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ABOUT LAURA LANDON:
 
Laura Landon is a Prairie Muse Platinum,
Kindle Press, and Amazon Montlake bestselling author. Laura enjoyed ten years
as a high school teacher and nine years making sundaes and malts in her very
own ice cream shop, but once she penned her first novel, she closed up shop to
spend every free minute writing. Now she enjoys creating her very own heroes
and heroines, and making sure they find their happily ever after.
A vital member of her rural community, Laura directed the town’s
Quasquicentennial, organized funding for an exercise center for the town, and
serves on the hospital board.

Laura lives in the Midwest, surrounded by her family and friends. She has
written nearly two dozen Victorian historicals, thirteen of which have been
published by Prairie Muse Publishing and are selling worldwide in English, one
in Japanese, and several in German. Two are Scottish historicals.In October 2012, Laura experienced an amazing day when Amazon’s Montlake
Romance published not one but three of her newest novels. Two of these have
been optioned for publication in Russia and Turkey. Several are also available
in German. To date Montlake had published seven of Laura’s Victorian
historicals and Kindle Press three.

Always beautifully set and with a mysterious twist or bit of suspense, Laura’s
books average over a million and a half pages a month read by her loyal
readers.

CONNECT
WITH LAURA:
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In addition to a thriving career as a novelist, author Darin Gibby is also one of the country’s premiere patent attorneys and a partner at the prestigious firm of Kilpatrick Townsend (www.kilpatricktownsend.com). With over twenty years of experience in obtaining patents on hundreds of inventions from the latest drug delivery systems to life-saving cardiac equipment, he has built IP portfolios for numerous Fortune 500 companies. In addition to securing patents, Gibby helps clients enforce and license their patents around the world, and he has monetized patents on a range of products.

Darin’s first book, Why Has America Stopped Inventing?, explored the critical issue of America’s broken patent system.  His second book, The Vintage Club, tells the story of a group of the world’s wealthiest men who are chasing a legend about a wine that can make you live forever. His third book, Gil, is about a high school coach who discovers that he can pitch with deadly speed and is given an offer to play with the Rockies during a player’s strike. Gil soon discovers, however, that his unexpected gift is the result of a rare disease, and continuing to pitch may hasten his own death.

With a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering and a Master of Business Administration degree, he is highly regarded in Denver’s legal and business community as a patent strategist, business manager, and community leader. He is also a sought-after speaker on IP issues at businesses, colleges and technology forums, where he demonstrates the value of patents using simple lessons from working on products such as Crocs shoes, Izzo golf straps and Trek bicycles.

An avid traveler and accomplished triathlete, Darin also enjoys back country fly-fishing trips and skiing in the Rocky Mountains. He lives in Denver with his wife, Robin, and their four children.

His latest book is the thriller, Chasing Hindy.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

About the Book:

 

ADDY’S DREAM AS a patent attorney is to help bring a ground breaking energy technology to the world. Addy’s hopes soar when she is wooed by Quinn, an entrepreneur, to join his company that has purportedly invented a car that can run on water using an innovative catalyst. After resigning her partnership to join Quinn, Addy discovers things aren’t as they seem. The patent office suppresses the company’s patent applications and her life is threatened by unknown assailants if she doesn’t resign.

When she is arrested for stealing US technology from the patent office she realizes Quinn has used her. Now, Addy must find a way to clear her name while salvaging her dream of propelling this technology to the world, all while powerful forces attempt to stop her.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Not at all.  I went to engineering school in college, and you never have to write in those classes.  Going to law school taught me how to write, and that’s where I gained my passion for writing.

What was your inspiration for Chasing Hindy?

The genesis behind Chasing Hindy came from a surprising source—a hypnotist. When I was in high school, we had an assembly where a hypnotist put a group of volunteers under hypnosis. One of the questions he asked them was what would be the fuel of the future. What fuel would people pump into their tank? Almost without exception they all said, “water!” The hypnotist then told the audience that every time he asked that question he received the same answer.

That was several decades ago, but I’ve always wondered whether that could possibly be true—and why all these people thought we’d all be driving cars that used water. In the following years, I realized that a car wouldn’t run on water per se, but from hydrogen that is extracted from water. The question, of course, is that if we know how to produce hydrogen, why aren’t there hydrogen cars? The answer is quite simple. As an engineer and patent attorney I know the science behind extracting hydrogen from water. The problem is that it takes more energy to do this than to just run a car on gasoline, or even electricity.

But what if somebody invented a way to make it happen? That’s the germ of an idea that led to Chasing Hindy.

Then, of course, is finding an idea for a main character. For me, a good character is far more difficult than finding a story idea. Not only does the character need to make the story line happen, but the readers need to relate to what the character is experiencing. I struggled with such a character for years, and, in fact, rewrote the book several times with other characters that just didn’t seem to work.

What made the story finally click was my discovery of Addy—a patent attorney with a dream to change the world. I decided on a female character (who was also a patent attorney) for several reasons. Perhaps the main reason was that female patent attorneys are in short supply and I wanted to encourage women to enter the profession. So I created Addy to hopefully show what a difference one person can make, and through her experience more women would want to become patent attorneys. What I love about Addy is her determination to make the world a better place, no matter the cost.  But you’ll have to read the book to see what obstacles she must overcome.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I like to take a character through a journey where her innermost beliefs are challenged, and even rocked to the core, in order to see how she will respond. Life is about journeys, and I think every book should take the reader on quest that changes the character and tells an important life lesson.  For example, my last book, Gil, is about transcending opposites and how opposition can be used to open your heart to compassion.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

Chasing Hindy took me over 15 years and five rewrites.  The reason why is because I could never find a main character that I liked. That all changed when I came up with Addy, whose story I mention above.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

Sometimes too disciplined.  Since I am a full time patent attorney, I take every free minute to write.  It’s usually at five in the morning, on weekends or on a plane.  I love writing on airplanes because there is nobody who can interrupt your thought process.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

As I mentioned above, finding a main character was the most difficult.  But explaining how a car can actually run on water was also a challenge.

What do you love most about being an author?

Writing.  As Stephen King is fond of saying, as long as you can wake up and write, life is going to be okay.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I went with a small press—Koehler Books. Koehler published my last two books, The Vintage Club and Gil, and we’ve had a great working relationship.  As such, I decided to use them for Chasing Hindy as well.

Where can we find you on the web?

I am at http://www.daringibby.com

 

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Andi O’Connor is the award-winning author The Dragonath Chronicles, The Vaelinel Trilogy, and The Legacy of Ilvania. She’s written multiple books, including the critically acclaimed Silevethiel, which is the 2015 Best Indie Book Award winner for Science Fiction/Fantasy, and the 2015 New Apple Official Selection for Young Adult. Silevethiel was also named to Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2013. Andi’s short story collection, Redemption, is a 2014 Kindle Book Awards Semifinalist.

You can frequently find Andi as a ​guest panelist at Comic Cons throughout the country including the Rhode Island Comic Con, Philcon, Conclave, WizardWorld, and Chessiecon. Andi also writes for Niume where she provides writing tips, advice, and insight on her career as an author. You can connect with Andi on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For more information, visit Andi’s website.

About the Book:

Darrak’s adventure concludes with this thrilling finale of The Dragonath Chronicles!  

Following the betrayal of two of his trusted companions and a devastating battle in Mystandia, Darrak’s talents are desperately needed by the citizens of both Earth and Dragonath. Torn with the decision of where his loyalty should remain, he finally decides to confide in Andillrian. Together, they craft a plan they hope will save Darrak’s home planet, but their optimism is short-lived.

The Hellborn’s army has begun the march to war.

With less than two weeks of preparation remaining, their weaknesses become unavoidably apparent. Planning for defeat suddenly becomes as important as planning for victory. Darrak’s insecurities continue until the moment the first arrows begin to fly. He can only hope that help from a few unlikely sources will be enough.

For if they fail, Dragonath will fall.

ORDER YOUR COPY:

Amazon

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Definitely! It comes naturally to me! I’ll even let you in on a little secret: I have absolutely no formal training. I’ve never taken a creative writing class in my life or attended any workshops. I’ve had a few authors and an editor (none of whom had read a word of my writing) tell me that I should get formal education in writing because that’s the way it should be done, and I politely said ‘thanks, but no thanks.’

Here’s the thing, I don’t think I need it. Whatever I’m doing is working for me. I have my own style that just came naturally, and I roll with it. I’ve won six awards to date, and the majority of my reviews are positive. I feel like if I took a formal class or workshop, it would screw with whatever is currently going on in my brain, so I’m content to leave well enough alone!

That being said, I don’t want it to sound like I don’t work to improve my writing. I do! Every author should. I just don’t do it in the traditional manners!

What was your inspiration for CALL TO WAR?

Call To War is the third and final book in a series, so the inspiration came from the previous two books in The Dragonath Chronicles. It picks up right where Awakening ended and deals with the main character, Darrak, essentially torn between two worlds. He’s tormented by the fact that he doesn’t truly belong anywhere but not wanting to turn his back on anyone.

There are some great twists and turns in Call To War, and characters’ secrets are finally revealed, making it all the more exciting. The main conflict is the final battle between Darrak’s supporters and the Hellborn who is seeking to destroy Darrak’s bloodline and claim rule over all of Dragonath.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

There is absolutely nothing I refuse to write about, and I have included many controversial topics in my writing such as abortion, religion, rape, abuse, suicide, and global epidemics. Call To War alone deals with rape, abuse, global terrorism, and environmental destruction. I write about these issues because they’re relatable. They’re things that affect many of my readers and can help them think and reflect on their own lives and societies. I’m a huge proponent of talking about and facing issues and learning about both the issues and their consequences. Ignoring something doesn’t make it go away.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

About a year from writing the first word to holding the printed book in front of me.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

You have to be disciplined to be a writer, even if it’s not what you do full-time. It’s easy to get distracted by other things, particularly if you write at home. I write full-time, so a typical day for me starts at 8 in the morning and goes until 6 or 7 at night. I’ll take the morning to work on marketing, promotion, accounting, organizing personal appearances, and preparing for any upcoming events. The afternoons and evenings are set aside for writing or editing, depending on the stage of my work.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

The most difficult thing in writing Call To War was writing the love scene. I’d written rape scenes before, but never a love scene, which was challenging in itself, but the book as a whole is extremely dark and violent, with the characters being in dire situations. A love scene felt right between two of the characters, but writing it, and writing it so it wasn’t out of place with the rest of the story, proved difficult.

What do you love most about being an author?

Touching people in ways I never thought possible. It’s truly incredible to me that my books have helped people get through some of the most difficult times in their lives, and it’s the most rewarding feeling imaginable.

I had one reader write to me saying she had cancer. What got her through her chemotherapy sessions was visualizing my elf city of Silverden from Silevethiel. Every time she went in for treatment, she would picture herself in the world I’d created, and it would help to calm her enough so she could forget where she was and why she was there.

Another woman told me that the relationship between Irewen (a human) and Silevethiel (a lion) perfectly captured the love and friendship she had with her cat. Re-reading scenes from Silevethiel helped her recapture the memory of that bond after her pet’s death.

Hearing such personal stories of how my work has affected people and brought hope into their lives makes being an author tremendously worthwhile. They vanquish all of the frustrations that come with the job and are what make being an author amazing. They’re why I’ll continue to write until my last breath.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

My first book, The Lost Heir, was originally published through a small press. I hated the experience and the amount of control I lost. I have since self-published all of my books, including Call To War, and re-released The Lost Heir under my imprint, Purple Sun Press.

I am extremely happy with my decision to switch to self-publishing; however, it takes a great deal of work and money and can at times be quite frustrating. I essentially follow the process of a traditional publisher and hire editors, a cover designer, a printer, and a distributor so it is done professionally and available to all major stores/retailers, libraries, indie bookstores, and distributors. The best compliment I had when I was still unsure of whether I’d made the correct decision to self-publish was before I’d re-released The Lost Heir. Someone thought that was the self-published book and Silevethiel, the first one I’d actually self-published, was the one that had gone through a traditional publisher. It was at that moment I knew I’d made the right decision.

Where can we find you on the web?

Website: www.andioconnor.net

Twitter: www.twitter.com/oconnorandi

Facebook: www.facebook.com/oconnor.andi

Instagram: www.instagram.com/andi_oconnor

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Inside the Book:

Title: Pauli the Musical Pumpkin
Author: Pamela O. Guidry
Publisher: AuthorHouse
Genre: Juvenile Fiction
Format: Ebook

This is an inspiring story of a family whose characters depend on each other’s unique personality traits to see them through life’s little journeys. With Luis, the strength and leadership is dominant, and Erin’s motherly love is profound. The two boys are very different both in looks and in spirit. Dominic is adventuresome, and the outdoors is his passion, whereas Donovan’s love for beauty and music is his motivation. Pauli, different from any of his family, is talented and musical and brings forth a feeling of magic when he plays his beautiful music. In the end, the family is reunited and reassured. Each of us is special in our own way. As long as we have each other, anything is possible.

Meet the Author:

Pamela O. Guidry was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1960. My parents were the most loving and wonderful parents. I grew up in a family of six children. With three sisters and two brothers, an adventure was always just around the corner. Because family is the most fundamental purpose in life, the experiences we have shared have shaped my life. At an early age, I developed a passion for music, as well as a love for art and creativity. As an adult, I further pursued the imagination and use of colors and textures in my work as a decorator. And now, my passion is to travel the world so that I may experience the beauty of nature and the people I meet along the way.

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In the worn and tired town of Gulch Fork, Arkansas, certified nursing assistant Samantha Caminos heads to her patient Rob Dean’s home and wonders how she can find common ground with the aloof, disabled Vietnam veteran who suffers from not only PTSD but also severe neuropathy caused by Agent Orange. As Samantha approaches the house, she has no idea that very soon their lives will take a new turn. Gulch Fork, a town once filled with Ozark tranquility, takes on an aura of evil when bizarre events begin to affect Rob and two other war-scarred veterans, Peter Ness and Ron Woods-Samantha’s father. But when Samantha learns that two elderly couples without living relatives in the area have fallen prey to fraud and embezzlement by a man who claims to be a pastor, she sets out on a quest to piece together a complex mystery fueled by those hell-bent on taking advantage of citizens too fragile to defend themselves. In this compelling novel based on true events, three veterans seeking peace and serenity from PTSD fall victim to injustice, prompting a young health care worker to investigate the evil that has infiltrated their once peaceful Arkansas town.

Bob Smith is a naval officer who had Agent Orange spilled on him in Vietnam and suffers from severe PTSD in addition to disabling neuropathy. After living in Spain, he returned to America and settled in the Ozarks, where he is happily pursuing his dream of writing. Sara Rhodes is a wife, mother, and certified nursing assistant who originally lived in Alaska before moving to the Ozarks with her family. Bob is her former patient whose teachings about PTSD helped her recognize her own father’s battle with it. Both Bob and Sara find animals to be a great source of comfort.

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Although Dr. Patrick Mbaya’s illness caused a lot distress and nearly took his life, the emotional symptoms of the depression he developed helped him understand and empathize with patients and how they feel when they become ill. In My Brain is Out of Control, Mbaya, fifty-five and at the peak of his career, shares a personal story of how he suffered from a brain infection in 2010 that caused loss of speech, right-sided weakness, and subsequent depression. He tells how he also dealt with the antibiotics complications of low white cell count and hepatitis. He narrates his experiences as a patient, the neurological and psychiatric complications he encountered, how he coped, and his journey to recovery. Presenting a personal perspective of Mbaya’s illness from the other side of the bed, My Brain is Out of Control, offers profound insight into battling a serious illness.

Dr. Patrick Mbaya is a medical doctor specializing in psychiatry. He is a consultant psychiatrist and honorary clinical lecturer in psychiatry at the University of Manchester, United Kingdom. He has a special interest in mood and addiction disorders.

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In his book Utilitarianism, John Stuart Mill refers to the great objects of human life. We may assume that that what Mill calls an object is the same as an objective in modern parlance. The examples of great objectives that Mill cites include power, fame, and money. One wonders how seriously Mill was actually endorsing such aims to be the overarching objectives of living or whether he was simply expressing his finding that many people actually do take such aims as these for life. The contention is that Mill was indeed recognizing that people do choose such goals in life. After all, happiness has been recognized as an objective of life at least since the time of Aristotle, and virtue has a similarly ancient pedigree. It is quite common for ordinary people to adopt such mottos as “Healthy, wealthy, and wise” as aims for life. But we know that having more than one such value can lead to conflicts. This had been a concern to Sidgwick as well as other nineteenth-century moralists. A resolution to the problem was found by the time of the twentieth century, when it was realized that we should not try to achieve definite objectives, but instead look to some other procedure, such as a variety of evolution, to shape our objectives. In that case, we make plans and evaluate them, as we proceed. We should use our values, as Dewey recommended, for guideposts. The book discusses the methods of arriving at such plans and weighs some of the ethical and moral problems an individual or a society might face at the present time.
Robert Finch is the author of five collections of essays and co-editor of The Norton Book of Nature Writing. He broadcasts a weekly commentary on NPR and serves on the faculty of the MFA in Writing Program at Spalding University in Louisville, KY. He lives in Wellfleet, MA.

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