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Kiran Bhat was born in Jonesboro, Georgia to parents from villages in Dakshina Kannada, India. An avid world traveler, polyglot, and digital nomad, he has currently traveled to more than 130 countries, lived in 18 different places, and speaks 12 languages. He currently lives in Melbourne, Australia.

Website  → http://iguanabooks.ca/

About the Book

The Internet has connected – and continues to connect – billions of people around the world, sometimes in surprising ways. In his sprawling new novel, we of the forsaken world, author Kiran Bhat has turned the fact of that once-unimaginable connectivity into a metaphor for life itself.

In, we of the forsaken world, Bhat follows the fortunes of 16 people who live in four distinct places on the planet. The gripping stories include those of a man’s journey to the birthplace of his mother, a tourist town destroyed by an industrial spill; a chief’s second son born in a nameless remote tribe, creating a scramble for succession as their jungles are destroyed by loggers; a homeless, one-armed woman living in a sprawling metropolis who sets out to take revenge on the men who trafficked her; and a milkmaid in a small village of shanty shacks connected only by a mud and concrete road who watches the girls she calls friends destroy her reputation.

Like modern communication networks, the stories in , we of the forsaken world connect along subtle lines, dispersing at the moments where another story is about to take place. Each story is a parable unto itself, but the tales also expand to engulf the lives of everyone who lives on planet Earth, at every second, everywhere.

As Bhat notes, his characters “largely live their own lives, deal with their own problems, and exist independently of the fact that they inhabit the same space. This becomes a parable of globalization, but in a literary text.”

Bhat continues:  “I wanted to imagine a globalism, but one that was bottom-to-top, and using globalism to imagine new terrains, for the sake of fiction, for the sake of humanity’s intellectual growth.”

“These are stories that could be directly ripped from our headlines. I think each of these stories is very much its own vignette, and each of these vignettes gives a lot of insight into human nature, as a whole.”

we of the forsaken world takes pride of place next to such notable literary works as David Mitchell’s CLOUD ATLAS, a finalist for the prestigious Man Booker Prize for 2004, and Mohsin Hamid’s EXIT WEST, which was listed by the New York Times as one of its Best Books of 2017.

Bhat’s epic also stands comfortably with the works of contemporary visionaries such as Umberto Eco, Haruki Murakami, and Philip K. Dick.

 

Order Your Copy

Amazon → https://amzn.to/2DQIclm

Barnes & Noble → https://bit.ly/2Lqe9Fi

Interview:

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Joyce Carol Oates once called me a born writer, so I would rather she say it, not me. But, yes, at the risk of sounding vain, I see myeslf as the only person who can do the things I do, and this space belongs very much to myself.

What was your inspiration for we, of the forsaken world…?

we, of the forsaken world… came to me in 2011, when I was on a bus between Dubrovnik and Zagreb. A tall, brunette woman with a lingering stare sat down next to me on one of the stops. We began to talk about a host of things I can’t remember now, but the one thing that she told me which did remain in my head was the following: Croatia is one of the poorest countries in the world. Something about that sentence inspired my imagination. After we reached the bus station, I had to sit on one of the metal benches for a few hours, and write. I was starting to imagine different countries, completely imagined in my head. One was a half-rich half poor megalopolis, the sort found in most third-world countries. Then, there was a town that wasn’t so different looking from my grandmother’s place, the southern Indian city of Mysore. There was a tribe in the middle of nowhere, not to mention a town of great touristic importance, destroyed by an industrial spill. I also imagined hundreds of voices. Though, over the course of time, those two hundred-so voices became around sixteen; the most distinct and boisterous of the lot.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

I started it in 2011, and I finished it in 2017. So, I would say about 6-7 years.

Are you disciplined?

Describe a typical writing day. I am quite a disciplined writer. I tend to work continuously for about 3-4 hours from the moment I wake up until it is time for lunch. In that time, I am usually able to do about 2,000 words. Sometimes, my writing is good, and sometimes it is bad, but I think that what is most important is getting it done.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Trying to make sure the structure worked. I wanted to merge the narratives of unrelated voices into a seamless narrative using the power of language, in the same way that digital networks blur the minds of billions of people into a place-less interface. I had to keep playing with the structure until I found something that worked (in this case, it was these poetic interludes, switching from one narrative to another).

What do you love most about being an author?

I think one thing that makes me really happy these days is feeling like I am being recognized for something which I have been doing for ages; people, from friends to family members, are finally eseing me as an author, and giving my art and vision respect, and that feeling of validation is simply priceless.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I had finished the book in 2016. One of my friends, who was an editor at a small press in New York, gave me a list of agents to contact. Most of them responsed stealthily and quickly, but after some months, they did not find my book – experimental, ambitious, overtly literary – to be a quick fit for the market. They had to turn it down. After about a year of waiting for these agents to respond, I started submitting to small presses. It was in 2019 that I got a response from an editor at Iguana Books. They were interested in publishing the book. I told them that I was still waiting for some other publishers to respond, so I asked them to wait for some weeks so that I could get some responses. Within two weeks, this same editor emailed me, asking me to follow up. He really liked this book, and wanted to publish it.

Before my work with Iguana Books, I hadn’t had a publisher respond to me so positively. Admittedly, Iguana Books is a hybrid press. This means that they vet every book project that they take on, but they ask the author to take on the financial burdens of publication. This still did not mean that they had to care so much about my writing. They did a lot of work, from the editorial stages, to the design of the cover, and the maps that I asked to have tailored onto the book itself, to make sure that the book was aesthetically enriched. They spent a lot of time with me talking on the phone, making sure all of my needs were met, from last-minute changes to a sentence or two, to having my books flown to Hong Kong or Delhi for the sake of book festivals. I do not think having been published by a hybrid press has downgraded the quality of my work in any way; if anything, I am glad to have had people who believe as fondly in my vision as I do. It makes me look forward to later publications, as well as the future of my career.

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Gordon Campbell is a Winnipeg born Canadian who’s spent most of his life in Japan. He’s worked as an English teacher, a market entry consultant with a focus on the medical and sporting goods industries, and as a sales director for a corporation with multiple product lines.

He’s presently working on the second novel of a series initiated with The Courier, and its protagonist, Gregg Westwood.

Gordon leans on his experiences built around decades working and traveling in Asia. He’s trained at several karate dojos, run full marathons, and skied black diamond hills in the Japanese Alps.

He played American football at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and started in the Canadian championship game known as the Vanier Cup. Gordon is a member of Psi Upsilon Fraternity, Sinim Masonic Lodge, and the Tokyo Valley of the AASR.

When he’s not writing, working, attending one of his daughter’s vocal concerts, pumping iron, or at a lodge meeting, you’ll find him dining with his wife Mako at their favorite local bistro.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS

Website → https://www.gordonjcampbell.com/

Facebook → https://www.facebook.com/gordonjcampbellauthor/

Twitter → https://twitter.com/GcampbellGordon

BOOK BLURB:

An expatriate businessman, Gregg Westwood, leaves the Officers’ Club at an American Air Base in Japan unaware about the impression he’s made on two intelligence agents. They sized him up as someone with potential for strategic deployment, and more importantly, he’s under the radar.

Gregg’s exploits start with what he thinks is a one-off assignment as a courier, and the straightforward task spirals out of control. He’s forced to rise to the occasion and use every resource available to survive. Even his family is jeopardized which forces him to return to Japan to settle scores.

The Courier is one man’s struggle to fight for survival in a world that he’s not been trained for and where violence and retribution are the names of the game.

 

Praise:

 

“The Bottom Line: One of the year’s best thrillers.”

–BestThrillers.com  ​

“With such fine attention to detail in creating some amazing scenes, I give The Courier 4 out of 4 stars. Campbell creates an amazing and well-edited adventure that could even someday work on the big screen. Readers that enjoy action adventures or thrillers will likely enjoy this one as well.”

–Official review by Kendra M Parker, OnlineBookClub.org

“The Courier is an exciting ride from start to finish. I couldn’t put it down and wanted more when it finished.”

–Gyle Graham, entrepreneur and longtime Tokyo expatriate

“The Courier would transform well from a thriller novel to an action movie.”

–Michael Harrison, marketing expert and martial artist

ORDER YOUR COPY

Amazon → https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07W89JND1?

 Goodreadshttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/47808197-the-courier

Interview:

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Shall we answer with a qualified “yes.”

Thousands of hours of my life were spent behind the keyboard developing marketing material, short stories for Japanese English Radio, and my blogs.

These exercises kept the artistic flame burning until focused time and energy was committed to writing The Courier.

What was your inspiration for The Courier?

The people met, and places visited while working over two decades in Japan inspired The Courier.

I asked myself what would happen if a salesman without military training entered into a dangerous situation unfamiliar to anything in his world. Could he stand up, persevere, and protect his family and friends?

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

The novel’s drafts were written and rewritten for three years. My editor pushed me to “kill my darlings” and create “new darlings.” I’m hoping some of the characters cut from The Courier will be resurrected as the “Gregg Westwood” series develops.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I wake up early and brush Oliver, my cat. This rewarding task is followed by a cup of coffee, and at least one hour of writing before the family wakes up. More time is spent writing on weekends when the day job doesn’t impede my creative time.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Most people love to learn but hate to be taught. There were honest and sometimes brutal critical evaluations received during the developmental phases of The Courier. I learned to take the hits and bounce back with improved work.

What do you love most about being an author?

There’s something magical about being genuinely into a story. The characters seem to act on their own accord, and the dialog will sometimes surprise you.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self-publish? What was the process like, and are you happy with your decision?

The Courier was submitted to some first novel competitions and received encouraging professional evaluations. I sent early drafts of The Courier to agents who replied with well written and mostly kind rejection letters.

It’s easy to contract developmental editors and copy editors. My collaboration with editors resulted in the final version of The Courier. It’s currently available on Amazon as a Kindle e-book, paperback, and an audiobook performed by Kevin Stillwell.

Self-publishing through Amazon expedited the book launch and made The Courier immediately accessible to the American military and expatriate communities in Asia. The results have been encouraging and we are enjoying the journey.

Thank you for your consideration of The Courier.

 

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Title: CHRISTMAS IN NEWFOUNDLAND: MEMORIES AND MYSTERIES

Author: Mike Martin

Publisher: Ottawa Press and Publishing

Pages: 113

Genre: Mystery/Memoir

From the author of the award-winning Sgt. Windflower Mysteries comes “Christmas in Newfoundland: Memories and Mysteries,” a welcome addition to the Sgt. Windflower family of books.

Christmas in Newfoundland is a special time. In the depths of long winter nights memories are made and stories are told. Of Christmas by candlelight and horse and buggy rides to church. Of shopping on Water Street in St. John’s before malls and the Internet.

In later years, Sgt. Windflower came to work and then to stay in the quiet town of Grand Bank by the Atlantic Ocean where the salt air froze in the wind and the Mounties were welcomed to warm themselves by every fire.

Come and warm yourself by the fire and hear their stories. Some memories and some mysteries. Enjoy some holiday time with Sgt. Windflower and all the familiar characters that you’d come to know and love. Good food, good friends and always another chair at the table.

Book Excerpt:

A Windflower Christmas

It was just days before Christmas, and Sergeant Winston Windflower only had one big problem. That was what to get his girlfriend, Sheila Hillier, for Christmas. Other than that, life was good for the RCMP officer in Grand Bank, Newfoundland. Crime was low, if not non-existent, and spirits were running high as the holiday neared its peak in this little seaside town.

Of course, being the holiday season, the Mountie was concerned about impaired driving. But Windflower and his team had been out on the roads for the past two weekends with the R.I.D.E. program. He figured that meant everyone would be on their best behaviour for the next couple of weeks. That was especially true since one town resident had been charged with impaired driving and two others had received suspended licences because they were just over the legal limit of alcohol.

Fortunately, even the weather was cooperating. They hadn’t had any snow in Grand Bank for almost two weeks. That was a relief to not only the snow shovellers catching a break after a series of early winter storms but also to the RCMP officers, as they had already worked several overnight shifts because of storms. The best news was that there wasn’t even any snow in the short-term forecast.

All of this meant the town could be festive and safe during the holiday season already well underway.

The old Town of Grand Bank went all out to pretty itself up for Christmas. Almost every house had some form of decoration, and Christmas lights were aplenty all over town. Some people went old-fashioned and just had a wreath on their front door and a couple of strings of lights hanging from their eaves. Others decided to splurge on nativity scenes and blow-up Santas, as they held nothing back in their gaudy and joyous celebration of the season.

Old Saint Nick had already made one visit. That was last weekend during the Santa Claus parade led by the antique pumper truck from the volunteer fire department. Local RCMP vehicles were decked out in flashing lights and ribbons as the Mounties collected toys and gifts along the parade route for the Salvation Army. Sheila had rounded up a few extra dollars from local businesses to ensure that even the abandoned buildings near the wharf were gaily festooned with ribbons, bows and the essential Christmas lights in time for the parade. Now, Saint Nick’s return engagement on December 25th was eagerly anticipated.

Amazon → https://amzn.to/32hC9zY 

Mike Martin was born in Newfoundland on the East Coast of Canada and now lives and works in Ottawa, Ontario. The Walker on the Cape was his first full fiction book and the premiere of the Sgt. Windflower Mystery Series. Other books in the series include The Body on the T, Beneath the Surface, A Twist of Fortune and A Long Ways from Home, which was shortlisted for the Bony Blithe Light Mystery Award as the best light mystery of the year. A Tangled Web was released in 2017 and the newest book in the series.is Darkest Before the Dawn which won the Bony Blithe Award in 2019. A new book in the series, Fire, Fog and Water is being released in October.

Mike is currently Chair of the Board of Crime Writers of Canada, a national organization promoting Canadian crime and mystery writers.

Website → www.sgtwindflowermysteries.com

Twitter Link: → http://ww.twitter.com/mike54martin

Facebook→https://www.facebook.com/TheWalkerOnTheCapeReviewsAndMore/

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Kathy Holmes grew up in Southern California near Disneyland and the beach with a book in one hand and a transistor radio in the other. She began writing stories about family and wrote her first song with a childhood friend. They called themselves the “Screamie Birds.”

Books have always spurred her love for travel, especially to places she’s read about, and location is often a character in her books.

After an exciting career in Silicon Valley, she is now combining her love for both books and music at Screamie Birds Studios. You can find out more about her books and music at http://www.kathyholmes.net.

Website: http://www.kathyholmes.net

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/screamiebirds

Inside the book

Nikki Durrance escaped the worst nightmare of her life when she fled Las Vegas for San Francisco, leaving her abusive husband Jeff behind at the Blue Diamond Saloon. Rebuilding her life in San Francisco with the help of her closest friend Sally, Nikki draws the line with one thing: men. But when she accompanies Sally on a business trip back in Las Vegas, Nikki meets Dr. Mike Fischer, a sexy and desirable pediatrician also from San Francisco.

After a whirlwind courtship followed by a proposal, Nikki panics and jumps on the nearest cruise ship to Mexico. Realizing she must face her fears rather than run from them, she returns home and accepts Mike’s proposal. Life picks up even more speed with Mike’s plans and Nikki panics once again, imagining that everything Mike does mirrors her ex-husband Jeff. Attempting to sort out what’s real and what’s not, Nikki begins to question everything, including her sanity when everything with Mike feels like déjà vu.

Amazon → https://amzn.to/32vYGZV

 Barnes & Noble → https://bit.ly/33yNop4

Interview:

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Yes, I started writing short stories about my family in elementary school, dabbled with writing fiction, and wrote a song with a childhood friend. I was so curious about how books were printed, and my questions were answered when I got to tour my first print shop with my junior high Journalism class.

What was your inspiration for Déjà vu at the Blue Diamond Saloon?

Actually, the first chapter came to me in a nightmare when we were living in Florida. I woke up, heart pounding, sweating, and knew I had to write it down. When we moved to Las Vegas, I saw this place called “The Blue Diamond Saloon” and I knew I had to write the story with a Las Vegas setting.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

It might have been a couple of years because after living in Florida, we lived in Oregon briefly before being relocated to Las Vegas for my husband’s job. I dabbled with it a bit in Oregon with an Oregon setting but changed the location to Las Vegas once we were there. I released the book first on Kindle and have now just released it in paperback

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

These days I’m also writing and producing music, so my daily schedule varies as far as what I’m working on. But I usually get up around 7 (or earlier if the cats wake me up), have coffee with my husband before he leaves for work) and then head out to my writing and music studio. I’m blessed to have a casita (separate building) set up for my studio so I can immerse myself in my books and music. My most productive working hours are from morning coffee until lunch. I usually have a short nap and then head back out to the studio in late afternoon for another hour or so until my husband gets home. I tend to get a second wind in the afternoon, maybe because early in my publishing career, I worked swing shift for a graphics/printing company for several years in San Francisco. I still love the smell of a print shop in the fall.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Deciding on the ending was challenging with this book. I usually write the beginning and the ending right away, but I wasn’t sure for a long time how it would end, who would be the bad guy, etc.

What do you love most about being an author?

I have a rich internal life, being an introvert and people-watcher, both good qualities for a writer. So writing, for me, is the joy of being in the company of strangers. When I spend too much time creating music, I start to miss them.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I’m a bit of a hybrid—I have published with small publishers, and independently, depending on the book and the situation. My first book found an agent and a small press, but they soon went out of business. So I then self-published it and discovered the joy of independence. Since then I’ve published with other small publishers and independently.

This book was published independently. I have to say, I love being an Indie Author, retaining control over the book. The downside is it’s a lot of work, either doing it myself or obtaining the services of others such as editing and cover art. But I have a background in technical publishing in Silicon Valley, so I have a lot of experience formatting, editing, and other production tasks.

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Katie focuses her mind, trying to keep another anxiety attack at bay. The victim’s long brown hair is slick and wet, her body rigid in the grass. She looks more like a mannequin than the woman Katie had spoken with only yesterday, the woman she had promised to protect… 

When a cold, naked body is discovered by a couple on a jog through the lush woodlands of Pine Valley, California, new recruit Detective Katie Scott is stunned to discover the victim is Amanda Payton – a much-loved local nurse and the woman at the heart of an unsolved case she’s been investigating whilst getting a grip on her crippling PTSD.

Weeks earlier, Amanda had run, battered and bruised, out into the headlights of a passing patrol car. She claimed to have just escaped a kidnapping, but with no strong evidence, the case went cold. The Pine Valley police made a fatal mistake… 

Katie is certain the marks on Amanda’s wrists complete a pattern of women being taken, held captive and then showing up dead in remote locations around Pine Valley – and she won’t let someone die on her watch again.

But then a beautiful office worker with a link to the hospital where Amanda worked goes missing. With only days before the next body is due to show up, can Katie make amends for her past by saving this innocent life?

Totally gripping crime fiction for fans of Lisa Regan, Rachel Caine and Melinda Leigh. Nothing will prepare you for this nail-biting roller-coaster ride…

Readers adore Jennifer Chase!

THERE WAS NO WAY I WAS PUTTING THIS BOOK DOWN!!!!!… I was literally holding my breathI HAD TO KNOW!!!!! As for the explosive ending WOW definitely not what or who I was expecting.’ Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars

I was really wowed by itI couldn’t put the book down and was trying to read as fast as I could so I could find out who the killer was. The ending took me by surpriseI was literally gasping for air… I would definitely recommend.’ Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars

Wow what an absolutely amazing fantastic read. I was hooked almost as soon as I started this book. I am still trying to pick my chin off the floor. I loved it from page one and couldn’t read the pages quick enough. I did not see the end coming…Awesome.’ Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars

If you read one police thriller this year make sure that it is this one… it will grip you from the start and will drag you into the story trying desperately to work out who the killer is but I promise you that you will not be able to figure it out.’ Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars

‘A great way to start a new series! It’s a wonderfully written roller-coaster ride. A must read!Book Obsessed Introverts, 5 stars

Wow!The hairs on my head stood up with this one!’ Goodreads reviewer, 5 stars

ORDER YOUR COPY

Amazon → https://tinyurl.com/yxdmmftw

Book Excerpt

A heavy evening mist clung to the windshield of the police car, obscuring the view of the forgotten neighborhood. In the few occupied houses curtains were drawn tightly leaving only thin cracks of light seeping around the edges. Some homes even had bars across the windows. This small rural community had been ignored by the rest of the lively, growing town around it for too long. It was in desperate need of attention and restoration.
Deputy Stan Miller flipped on the wipers to clear his view, only to smear streaks of dirt across the windshield. He let out an annoyed sigh and turned the wipers to a higher speed—making it worse—and then off again.
“Now you’ve done it,” said Deputy Karl Windham beside him, and Miller laughed in spite of himself after a long and uneventful night shift.
“You’re going to criticize me?” Miller joked. “Me? The guy who has your back?” He sat up straighter, sucking in his waist and adjusting his seatbelt; it was no use pretending he hadn’t put on a few extra pounds recently.
“It’s the kiss of death out here tonight,” complained Windham watching out the side window as the mist turned to light rain.
“I bet it was Sheriff Scott’s idea to double us up, with all those recent ambushes on cops around the state.”
“It probably has something to do with the mayor’s office. Who knows? You know how they don’t tell us anything, even though we’re the ones putting our asses on the line every shift.” Still gazing out of the window, he watched a dark figure dart around a garbage can and disappear into the darkness, then he turned his attention to a skinny cat scurrying along the sidewalk, nose close to the ground tracking something.
The rain got heavier as they drove deeper into the Basin Woods Development. There were no other vehicles on the road. No lights in the distance. Only darkness.
“You hungry?” asked Miller.
“I wouldn’t turn down a cup of coffee,” replied Windham.
“Me neither.”
Deputy Miller took his eyes off the road for a moment to check the time and looked back just in time to see a slender woman stagger into the road ahead of them. She stopped still in the headlights. Her long hair, wet from the rain, was plastered against her head and around her face. She wore only a pair of panties and a tattered tank top. She looked terrified, dark eyes pleading in the glare of the lights, her mouth forming words they could not hear.
“Hey!” yelled Windham to his partner. “Stop!”
Miller jammed on the brakes, making the patrol car bounce to a stop inches before hitting the young woman. Weak and unbalanced, she fell to her knees. In the glare of the headlights, both men could clearly see the dirt embedded on her face and neck, the blood seeping from wounds on her hands, elbows, legs, and feet.
Deputy Miller turned to his partner with wide eyes. “What the…?” Jamming the vehicle into park he picked up the radio. “Dispatch, this is 3741, we have a possible 10-16 at Lincoln and Travis. Will keep you updated. Copy.”
“Copy that,” replied Dispatch.
He nodded to Windham who swung open the car door and ran to kneel beside the woman. “Miss…” he spoke gently. “Are you alright?”
She shook uncontrollably. Her head and shoulders drooped as her mouth tried to form around a word.
“Can you tell us what happened?” Windham said.
He gently touched her shoulder and she flinched away from him. “It’s okay. You’re okay now,” he reassured.
“Truth… truth… the truth… you don’t understand… otherwise…” she finally managed between gasps for breath. “I told the truth…” she muttered.
“What truth?” asked Deputy Miller who had retrieved a blanket from the trunk and now stood a few feet away.
She stopped speaking and slowly looked up at the deputy, her eyes filled with fear. Then she whispered, “I told the truth… I told the truth… told… the truth.”
Both deputies carefully helped the woman up and gently wrapped the blanket around her.
“What’s your name?” asked Windham.
“A… Aman… Amanda,” she said slowly.
“Okay, Amanda. We want to help you. Can you tell us what happened?”
“I tried…” she whispered. “It was…” Her voice trailed off.
Deputy Miller opened the back door to the patrol car as his partner gently guided her to sit down in the backseat. Miller handed her a small bottle of water and, after a few moments, her eyes focused on the officers and her breath began to steady.
Deputy Windham kneeled down to her eye level and asked, “Amanda, can you tell us what happened to you? Do you remember what happened? Anything?”
She shook her head as more tears welled up in her eyes.
“It’s okay.”
“A blue door with white trim,” she said quietly. “A big box…”
“What else, Amanda? Can you remember anything else?”
“There was a fantasy tree…”
Confused by the description, the deputy tried to make sense of it, pushing gently to pry out any more details from her. “Can you tell us what happened?”
Taking a couple of deep breaths, she finally spoke: “I was k-kidnapped.”

About The Author

Jennifer Chase is a multi award-winning and best-selling crime fiction author, as well as a consulting criminologist. Jennifer holds a bachelor degree in police forensics and a master’s degree in criminology & criminal justice. These academic pursuits developed out of her curiosity about the criminal mind as well as from her own experience with a violent psychopath, providing Jennifer with deep personal investment in every story she tells. In addition, she holds certifications in serial crime and criminal profiling.  She is an affiliate member of the International Association of Forensic Criminologists, and member of the International Thriller Writers.

Website → https://authorjenniferchase.com/

Twitter → https://twitter.com/JChaseNovelist

Facebook → https://www.facebook.com/AuthorJenniferChase/

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The spirit of Simon Dillon took human form in 1975, in accordance with The Prophecy. He kept a low profile during his formative years, living the first twenty or so of them in Oxford, before attending University in Southampton, and shortly afterwards hiding undercover in a television job. In the intervening years, he honed his writing skills and has now been unleashed on the world, deploying various short stories and novels to deliberately and ruthlessly entertain his readers. He presently lives in the South-West of England with his wife and two children, busily brainwashing the latter with the books he loved growing up.

website & Social links

Website:

https://simondillonbooks.wordpress.com/

Blog:

https://simondillonbooks.wordpress.com/

Twitter: 

https://twitter.com/UncleFlynn

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/simondillonbooks/

About the Book

Small-time actress Mia Yardley, recently widowed wife of renowned actor Steven Yardley, discovers her late husband’s secret acting diary. The diary details appointments made with a psychic medium, who advised Steven on which roles to take. It also raises questions about his mysterious and inexplicable suicide. Seeking answers, Mia speaks to the medium, but in doing so is drawn into an ever- deepening mystery about what happened to her husband during the final days of his life. Eventually, she is forced to ask the terrible question: was Steven Yardley murdered by a vengeful evil from beyond the grave?

ORDER YOUR COPY BELOw!

Amazon → https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1689624302/

 

Interview:

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Let’s put it this way: I can’t remember when I first started inventing stories or putting them on paper, but I’ve always done it. In the end, I decided to try and do it professionally, and now here we are. Of course, I couldn’t have done it without the voices in my head that won’t shut up, but these days I’m getting better at forcing them to form an orderly queue and speak to me one at a time.

What was your inspiration for Phantom Audition?

There were two main sources of inspiration for Phantom Audition. Firstly, the idea of an actor taking advice on roles from a medium comes from the late, great Peter Sellers, who did exactly that in real life. In the novel, protagonist Mia Yardley’s late husband Steven, a famous actor, took a film role playing famous abstract artist Edward Bingley, who like Steven committed suicide in mysterious circumstances. When Mia discovers Steven took this role on the advice of a medium, she comes to suspect her husband may have buried himself in the role a little too much, to the point where supernatural forces were involved.

The second source of inspiration for Phantom Audition is A Fantastic Woman. This Chilean film, which won Best Foreign Film at the 2018 Oscars, might at first appear an odd choice as an influence on Phantom Audition. Nonetheless, it actually provided the initial spark that launched the idea for the novel. The story concerns a transgender woman dealing with the death of her partner, finding herself isolated and ostracised by his family. The film has a dreamlike, magical realist quality to it, and even at times becomes a bit like a thriller (there’s a mysterious key which her partner left, for example). Moreover, there is something of a descent into the underworld/death and rebirth metaphor in the film, a story arc which is very much echoed in my novel. One image particularly leapt out at me – that of a ghostly vision of the dead partner staring out at her from a crowded nightclub dance floor amid strobe lights. It’s an image I actually nicked, sorry, “paid homage” to.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

In terms of the actual writing, this is the fastest novel I’ve ever written. It took two (very intensive) months to write the first draft. Add another month or so on top of that for the outlines, character profiles, and other research.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

Yes, I am very disciplined. Whilst writing a novel or short story I try to write at least 1,000 words per day on Mondays to Fridays, and 2,000 words per day at weekends. This is whilst juggling a full-time job (lunch hours are fiercely ring-fenced for writing), family commitments, reading, and cinema-going. As a result, I’m not very sociable, but sacrifices always have to be made, if you’re serious about writing.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

The greatest challenge is always my own self-doubt. Somewhere during the writing process, George McFly Syndrome hits (“What if people think I’m no good? I just can’t take that kind of rejection!”). Learning to battle past that is key. I had a major George McFly moment on Phantom Audition regarding the ending, which originally had been the thing that made me want to write the novel. I outlined six alternatives, before finally settling on what I had envisaged all along. Judging by the way readers are responding, I’m glad I had the nerve to go with my original instinct.

What do you love most about being an author?

I find writing comforting, challenging, and cathartic. There is also no better feeling in the world than knowing you’ve delivered a gripping, thrilling, scary, surprising, satisfying, moving, and transcendent narrative to a reader.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I went with a small traditional publisher, Dragon Soul Press, for this novel. I came to the attention of Dragon Soul Press last year, and they rapidly published three of my gothic mysteries – Spectre of Springwell Forest, The Irresistible Summons, and most recently Phantom Audition. It’s been great to have a proper editor, as well as someone with an eye on publicity opportunities (such as this one), and the covers they’ve designed have been amazing. If you’ll forgive my use of an obscenity, it really is a “team” effort. I’ve also been very pleased with the reviews I’ve had for all three of the afore-mentioned novels.

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Deborah Serani is an award-winning author and psychologist who has been in practice for thirty years. She is also a professor at Adelphi University and is a go-to media expert for psychological issues. Her interviews can be found in Newsday, Psychology Today, The Chicago Tribune, The New York Times, The Associated Press, and affiliate radio programs at CBS and NPR, among others. Dr. Serani has also been a technical advisor for the NBC television show, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. The recurring character, Judge D. Serani, was named after her.

 

★WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS★

 

Website:  https://www.drdeborahserani.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeborahSerani

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dr-Deborah-Serani-227062310643715/

BOOK BLURB:

Dr. Alicia Reese, a recent widow and a CODA – a child of Deaf Adults, takes on a new patient. Lucas Ferro reveals the reason for his consultation is that he wasn’t really open with his previous therapist. After gaining Reese’s trust, he shares aspects of his life that are clearly disturbing – experiences that create anxiety and panic, but also reveal horrifying psychopathology. Instead of referring Ferro elsewhere, Reese chooses to continue working with him, feeling reinvigorated by the challenge of his case.

As sessions progress, and Ferro’s disclosures become more menacing, Reese finds herself wedged between the cold hard frame of professional ethics and the integrity of personal truth – and learns just how far she’s willing to go, willing to risk and willing to lose to do the right thing.

★★★★★ORDER YOUR COPY★★★★★

Amazon → https://tinyurl.com/y6qz2sto

 

Would you call yourself a born writer? Mmmm, no. I think I fell into writing by choice and became better at it as time went by. I don’t think I’m a natural writer as much as a person who loves to write.

What was your inspiration for THE NINTH SESSION? I wondered what a person would do in an unwinnable situation… would professional ethics or would moral truth be the victor. And how would one live with such a choice.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing? I like exploring different cultures, showing the inner workings of psychology – and how trauma effects people.

How long did it take you to complete the novel? It took about a year to write the novel. Getting it published took many, many, many years.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day. I’m not a scheduled writer. I write when I can, which is just about every day. Usually in the morning or late at night when everything’s quiet.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book? THE NINTH SESSION was the easiest book I ever wrote write from first page to last page. What was difficult, however, was building the tension and pacing the suspense as the story unfolded. That took a lot of effort. And time. And edits.

What do you love most about being an author? I enjoy words – and love how certain phrases and sentences move me. So, it’s nice to read or hear how my writing has touched a reader’s life.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision? I originally had an agent for this book and went the traditional publishing route. I was younger at the time, and found my voice as a writer was being edited by both the agent and the publishing houses. The book lost its uniqueness – and after talking with more seasoned authors, I fired my agent and left the traditional publishing route. It was really hard to bounce back from that experience, but in time, found my momentum again. I turned to Indie publishers – and found that experience so much more supportive and encouraging of my work. I’ve been published independently for almost a decade now, with many books in different genres.

Where can we find you on the web? Readers can find me at my website https://www.drdeborahserani.com

 

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