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Archive for the ‘Virtual Book Tour Guests’ Category

Title: THE RAID ON TROY
Author: Murray Lee Eiland Jr.
Publisher: Independent
Pages: 300
Genre: Light Fantasy / Historical Fiction / YA

The Greek raid on Troy is chronicled in the Iliad and the Odyssey. These poems are pillars of ancient literature and continue to be carefully studied. Homer, who lived in the 8th or 7th century BC, is credited as the author. The actual conflict has been dated from 1260-1180 BC or even earlier. The question is, how close is Homer’s account to real history?

In the Orfeo Saga volume seven there are some familiar characters from Homer. Their motivations, as well as their history, can be radically different. Memnon is a self-made man and a petty king who craves the fabled gold of Troy. His brother Menas is king of Sparta. They assemble a coalition to sack the city. Telemon, not eager to join the expedition, is moved to act after his daughter Elena is taken. He seizes the city of Mycenae and goes to Troy. Odysees might not be as clever or brave as the man described in Homer, but he joins the expedition out of greed. He soon meets Orfeo’s son, who is in search of his first real adventure. Orfeo is on the Trojan side, and has to face the assembled military might of Greece as well as Odysees cunning plans. The Greeks have Ajax, who they count on to defeat any foe in single combat. Can Telemon – now an old man – defeat the greatest Greek warrior and recover his daughter?

The Raid on Troy might not be any closer to real history than the ancient poems, but it does offer insights into what might form the basis of the stories.

ORDER YOUR COPY:

Amazon

Excerpt:

Memnon knew the ship was hitting the beach. He heard the scraping of the hull against sand and

pebbles, and the angle of the deck changed as the prow rose higher. He had not seen the ship’s deck for days, nor had he been permitted to walk around on land for perhaps two years. Slaves on Theran ships were treated with about the same respect as sheep, only slaves could not even be eaten because of some Theran religious prohibition. Galley slaves were useful,but were neither expensive nor in short supply.

At age fourteen, Memnon had seen little else of the world, as he had been seized in a slaver raid as he and his brothers played on an unknown beach now well beyond remembering. He knew he was less than five years old at the time, and now he believed he was nearly fifteen, although no one had been interested in explaining the concept of birthdays to him. Memnon had learned virtually all of what he knew from other slaves in the orchards of Thera, where he had begun his working career by carrying buckets of water to the men who tended the trees and picked the fruit. He had been separated from the two older brothers seized at the same time, but recognized one of them as he was taken to his place at an oar on one of the warships the Therans used to exact tribute from various cities; Memnon had occasionally spoken with him when their different groups of oarsmen were allowed on deck

Memnon recognized that his brother burned with rage. Over time, Memnon found himself coming to understand its origin and nature. Although he could not recall much about his life before his abduction, he remembered a world with occasional comforts, and even times of celebration.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Dr Eiland is a psychiatrist by training, and has written about Near Eastern art and culture. His novels are set in the heroic past and feature fictional characters in a realistic matrix. He has a special interest in exploring how and why people lead. The books contain themes that are suitable for young adults who have an interest in history.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

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Joe Bendoski studied psychology in college and was fascinated by all the insights it provided into human behavior, only to realize most the information never reach people, and when it did, rarely was it in a form that allowed for practical application. He started writing non-fiction, but soon came to understand how few people read that genre and began the difficult transition into fiction writing. His non-fiction works include; the Chemistry of Attraction and the Language of Emotion.

He worked as the head writer for the television show ‘Saved by Grace.’ After being frustrated with comments like “make this scene cheaper,” “What’s my motivation?”, and “Do we need this scene?” he decided to go in to literature.

His latest book is the thriller/espionage/conspiracy/historical novel, When the Sky Falls.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

Would you call yourself a born writer?

No. I think writing is an incredibly complex skill that has to be developed. I also know that some writers pick up the craft just by reading, while other have to study directly. I’m the second kind.

What was your inspiration for When the Sky Falls?

I heard a podcast on the 1938 War of the Worlds scare, and it made me curious. One of the most interesting things to me was the conclusion that it could never happen again. That didn’t make sense to me, that’s not how real science reaches a conclusion, not only that but it happened again only six years later in Chile. Clearly, they got it wrong. I wanted to know what they missed

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

Mass media persuasion is a big focus of the story, and it’s not subtle.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

Seven years. A lot of what was just learning how to write fiction, create characters, complicate them, write a setting that supports the emotional tone of the chapter. There was so much, and I’m still learning.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I have my daily schedule in certain blocks, some for writing, some for marketing, but I shuffle them around based any immediate demands. I used to write more, but now that I’m marketing my books that takes a lot of time.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Answering the question of how it was all possible. How people have their fundamental beliefs about reality shifted in less than an hour? I spent years collecting pieces that all seemed relevant, but none actually answered the question outright.

What do you love most about being an author?

The first draft. Some days I hate writing it, but most of the time I get lost in the story, and it’s raw creation. It’s both calming and invigorating all at the same moment. I hate it when I’m done and know a lot of work needs to be put in to fix it, but during that first draft my imagination runs wild, and I love it.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self-publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I went indie with this one. On my first book, almost 8 years ago, I received a $40k advance, and 16% royalties on the back end. The offer I got for this book was $1,000 advance and 7% royalties on the back end. The indie market has cut such a big hole in traditional publishing that it’s not really worth it to pursue that avenue anymore. If you just want to write a single book and get it out there, traditional is a good way to go, but if you want to make a living at writing, indie is the new path.

Where can we find you on the web?

Joseph-bendoski.com is my website. You can also find me on Twitter @Jbendoski or my podcast on writing craft Start Writing. There is a fan page for me as an author, and I also run a Facebook group for my podcast. Since the podcast has started to take off, I have a huge backlog of Twitter messages and what not so it might take while for me to get to people who use that route. My website will connect people my email, and I’m really good and clearing that out each day.

 

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Mark Oristano has been a professional writer/journalist since the age of 16.

After growing up in suburban New York, Oristano moved to Texas in 1970 to attend Texas Christian University.  A major in Mass Communications, Mark was hired by WFAA-TV in 1973 as a sports reporter, the start of a 30-year career covering the NFL and professional sports.

Mark has worked with notable broadcasters including Verne Lundquist, Oprah Winfrey and as a sportscaster for the Dallas Cowboys Radio Network and Houston Oilers Radio Network.  He has covered Super Bowls and other major sports events throughout his career.  He was part of Ron Chapman’s legendary morning show on KVIL-FM in Dallas for nearly 20 years.

In 2002 Oristano left broadcasting to pursue his creative interests, starting a portrait photography business and becoming involved in theater including summer productions with Shakespeare Dallas. He follows his daughter Stacey’s film career who has appeared in such shows as Friday Night Lights and Bunheads.

A veteran stage actor in Dallas, Mark Oristano was writer and performer for the acclaimed one-man show “And Crown Thy Good: A True Story of 9/11.”

Oristano authored his first book, A Sportscaster’s Guide to Watching Football: Decoding America’s Favorite Game. A Sportcaster’s Guide offers inside tips about how to watch football, including stories from Oristano’s 30-year NFL career, a look at offense, defense and special teams, and cool things to say during the game to sound like a real fan.

In 2016 Oristano finished his second book, Surgeon’s Story, a true story about a surgeon that takes readers inside the operating room during open heart surgery. His second book is described as a story of dedication, talent, training, caring, resilience, guts and love.

In 1997, Mark began volunteering at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, working in the day surgery recovery room. It was at Children’s that Mark got to know Kristine Guleserian, MD, first to discuss baseball, and later, to learn about the physiology, biology, and mystery of the human heart. That friendship led to a joint book project, Surgeon’s Story, about Kristine’s life and career.

Mark is married and has two adult children and two grandchildren.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

About the Book:

What is it like to hold the beating heart of a two-day old child in your hand?  What is it like to counsel distraught parents as they make some of the most difficult decisions of their lives?

Noted pediatric heart surgeon Dr. Kristine Guleserian has opened up her OR, and her career, to author Mark Oristano to create Surgeon’s Story – Inside OR-6 With a top Pediatric Heart Surgeon. 

Dr. Guleserian’s life, training and work are discussed in detail, framed around the incredibly dramatic story of a heart transplant operation for a two-year old girl whose own heart was rapidly dying.  Author Mark Oristano takes readers inside the operating room to get a first-hand look at pediatric heart surgeries most doctors in America would never attempt.

That’s because Dr. Guleserian is recognized as one of the top pediatric heart surgeons in America, one of a very few who have performed a transplant on a one-week old baby. Dr. Guleserian (Goo-liss-AIR-ee-yan) provided her expertise, and Oristano furnished his writing skills, to produce A Surgeon’s Story.

As preparation to write this stirring book, Oristano spent hours inside the operating room at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas watching Guleserian perform actual surgeries that each day were life or death experiences. Readers will be with Dr. Guleserian on her rounds, meeting with parents, or in the Operating Room for a heart transplant.

Oristano is successful sportscaster and photographer and has made several appearances on stage as an actor. He wrote his first book A Sportscaster’s Guide to Watching Football: Decoding America’s Favorite Game, and continues to volunteer at Children’s Medical Center.

“We hear a lot about malpractice and failures in medical care,” says Oristanto, “but I want my readers to know that parts of the American health care system work brilliantly. And our health care system will work even better if more young women would enter science and medicine and experience the type of success Dr. Guleserian has attained.”

Readers will find all the drama, intensity, humor and compassion that they enjoy in their favorite fictionalized medical TV drama, but the actual accounts in Surgeon’s Story are even more compelling. One of the key characters in the book is 2-year-old Rylynn who was born with an often fatal disorder called Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and was successfully treated by Dr. Guleserian.

Watch the Book Trailer at YouTube.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Well, I came from a very literate family. Reading was always stressed. I taught myself to read at age 2.5. I’ve always had a flair for language, so maybe it is born, who knows?

What was your inspiration for SURGEON’S STORY?

I’ve been a volunteer at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas for 20 years, and that’s where Dr. Kristine Guleserian is a heart surgeon. The more I got to know her and know about her, the more I thought she was a perfect subject for a book. Luckily, when I pitched her the idea, she readily agreed.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

The truth of real people and what makes them tick. Why they do what they do.

How long did it take you to complete the book?

Six years, but that was mostly because any time we had an editing session or some interview time carved out, we’d have to cancel it so Dr. G could go to the OR and operate.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

Up at 9. Coffee and newspapers. Breakfast. NY Times Crossword (mandatory for writers), emails and catchup. At noon, writing until four. Then the rest of the day to do whatever.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

The amount of technical/medical knowledge I had to acquire. I had to learn about the anatomy of the heart both before and after birth. I had to learn terms like homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Heck, just typing some of them is difficult.

What do you love most about being an author?

I’m always employee of the month.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

We had several New York houses who were interested, but only if the book was done in the doctor’s first person voice, which she refused, saying it was too egotistical. So we self published.

Where can we find you on the web?

http://www.surgeonsstory.com

 

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In addition to a thriving career as a novelist, author Darin Gibby is also one of the country’s premiere patent attorneys and a partner at the prestigious firm of Kilpatrick Townsend (www.kilpatricktownsend.com). With over twenty years of experience in obtaining patents on hundreds of inventions from the latest drug delivery systems to life-saving cardiac equipment, he has built IP portfolios for numerous Fortune 500 companies. In addition to securing patents, Gibby helps clients enforce and license their patents around the world, and he has monetized patents on a range of products.

Darin’s first book, Why Has America Stopped Inventing?, explored the critical issue of America’s broken patent system.  His second book, The Vintage Club, tells the story of a group of the world’s wealthiest men who are chasing a legend about a wine that can make you live forever. His third book, Gil, is about a high school coach who discovers that he can pitch with deadly speed and is given an offer to play with the Rockies during a player’s strike. Gil soon discovers, however, that his unexpected gift is the result of a rare disease, and continuing to pitch may hasten his own death.

With a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering and a Master of Business Administration degree, he is highly regarded in Denver’s legal and business community as a patent strategist, business manager, and community leader. He is also a sought-after speaker on IP issues at businesses, colleges and technology forums, where he demonstrates the value of patents using simple lessons from working on products such as Crocs shoes, Izzo golf straps and Trek bicycles.

An avid traveler and accomplished triathlete, Darin also enjoys back country fly-fishing trips and skiing in the Rocky Mountains. He lives in Denver with his wife, Robin, and their four children.

His latest book is the thriller, Chasing Hindy.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

About the Book:

 

ADDY’S DREAM AS a patent attorney is to help bring a ground breaking energy technology to the world. Addy’s hopes soar when she is wooed by Quinn, an entrepreneur, to join his company that has purportedly invented a car that can run on water using an innovative catalyst. After resigning her partnership to join Quinn, Addy discovers things aren’t as they seem. The patent office suppresses the company’s patent applications and her life is threatened by unknown assailants if she doesn’t resign.

When she is arrested for stealing US technology from the patent office she realizes Quinn has used her. Now, Addy must find a way to clear her name while salvaging her dream of propelling this technology to the world, all while powerful forces attempt to stop her.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Not at all.  I went to engineering school in college, and you never have to write in those classes.  Going to law school taught me how to write, and that’s where I gained my passion for writing.

What was your inspiration for Chasing Hindy?

The genesis behind Chasing Hindy came from a surprising source—a hypnotist. When I was in high school, we had an assembly where a hypnotist put a group of volunteers under hypnosis. One of the questions he asked them was what would be the fuel of the future. What fuel would people pump into their tank? Almost without exception they all said, “water!” The hypnotist then told the audience that every time he asked that question he received the same answer.

That was several decades ago, but I’ve always wondered whether that could possibly be true—and why all these people thought we’d all be driving cars that used water. In the following years, I realized that a car wouldn’t run on water per se, but from hydrogen that is extracted from water. The question, of course, is that if we know how to produce hydrogen, why aren’t there hydrogen cars? The answer is quite simple. As an engineer and patent attorney I know the science behind extracting hydrogen from water. The problem is that it takes more energy to do this than to just run a car on gasoline, or even electricity.

But what if somebody invented a way to make it happen? That’s the germ of an idea that led to Chasing Hindy.

Then, of course, is finding an idea for a main character. For me, a good character is far more difficult than finding a story idea. Not only does the character need to make the story line happen, but the readers need to relate to what the character is experiencing. I struggled with such a character for years, and, in fact, rewrote the book several times with other characters that just didn’t seem to work.

What made the story finally click was my discovery of Addy—a patent attorney with a dream to change the world. I decided on a female character (who was also a patent attorney) for several reasons. Perhaps the main reason was that female patent attorneys are in short supply and I wanted to encourage women to enter the profession. So I created Addy to hopefully show what a difference one person can make, and through her experience more women would want to become patent attorneys. What I love about Addy is her determination to make the world a better place, no matter the cost.  But you’ll have to read the book to see what obstacles she must overcome.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I like to take a character through a journey where her innermost beliefs are challenged, and even rocked to the core, in order to see how she will respond. Life is about journeys, and I think every book should take the reader on quest that changes the character and tells an important life lesson.  For example, my last book, Gil, is about transcending opposites and how opposition can be used to open your heart to compassion.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

Chasing Hindy took me over 15 years and five rewrites.  The reason why is because I could never find a main character that I liked. That all changed when I came up with Addy, whose story I mention above.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

Sometimes too disciplined.  Since I am a full time patent attorney, I take every free minute to write.  It’s usually at five in the morning, on weekends or on a plane.  I love writing on airplanes because there is nobody who can interrupt your thought process.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

As I mentioned above, finding a main character was the most difficult.  But explaining how a car can actually run on water was also a challenge.

What do you love most about being an author?

Writing.  As Stephen King is fond of saying, as long as you can wake up and write, life is going to be okay.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I went with a small press—Koehler Books. Koehler published my last two books, The Vintage Club and Gil, and we’ve had a great working relationship.  As such, I decided to use them for Chasing Hindy as well.

Where can we find you on the web?

I am at http://www.daringibby.com

 

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Andi O’Connor is the award-winning author The Dragonath Chronicles, The Vaelinel Trilogy, and The Legacy of Ilvania. She’s written multiple books, including the critically acclaimed Silevethiel, which is the 2015 Best Indie Book Award winner for Science Fiction/Fantasy, and the 2015 New Apple Official Selection for Young Adult. Silevethiel was also named to Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2013. Andi’s short story collection, Redemption, is a 2014 Kindle Book Awards Semifinalist.

You can frequently find Andi as a ​guest panelist at Comic Cons throughout the country including the Rhode Island Comic Con, Philcon, Conclave, WizardWorld, and Chessiecon. Andi also writes for Niume where she provides writing tips, advice, and insight on her career as an author. You can connect with Andi on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For more information, visit Andi’s website.

About the Book:

Darrak’s adventure concludes with this thrilling finale of The Dragonath Chronicles!  

Following the betrayal of two of his trusted companions and a devastating battle in Mystandia, Darrak’s talents are desperately needed by the citizens of both Earth and Dragonath. Torn with the decision of where his loyalty should remain, he finally decides to confide in Andillrian. Together, they craft a plan they hope will save Darrak’s home planet, but their optimism is short-lived.

The Hellborn’s army has begun the march to war.

With less than two weeks of preparation remaining, their weaknesses become unavoidably apparent. Planning for defeat suddenly becomes as important as planning for victory. Darrak’s insecurities continue until the moment the first arrows begin to fly. He can only hope that help from a few unlikely sources will be enough.

For if they fail, Dragonath will fall.

ORDER YOUR COPY:

Amazon

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Definitely! It comes naturally to me! I’ll even let you in on a little secret: I have absolutely no formal training. I’ve never taken a creative writing class in my life or attended any workshops. I’ve had a few authors and an editor (none of whom had read a word of my writing) tell me that I should get formal education in writing because that’s the way it should be done, and I politely said ‘thanks, but no thanks.’

Here’s the thing, I don’t think I need it. Whatever I’m doing is working for me. I have my own style that just came naturally, and I roll with it. I’ve won six awards to date, and the majority of my reviews are positive. I feel like if I took a formal class or workshop, it would screw with whatever is currently going on in my brain, so I’m content to leave well enough alone!

That being said, I don’t want it to sound like I don’t work to improve my writing. I do! Every author should. I just don’t do it in the traditional manners!

What was your inspiration for CALL TO WAR?

Call To War is the third and final book in a series, so the inspiration came from the previous two books in The Dragonath Chronicles. It picks up right where Awakening ended and deals with the main character, Darrak, essentially torn between two worlds. He’s tormented by the fact that he doesn’t truly belong anywhere but not wanting to turn his back on anyone.

There are some great twists and turns in Call To War, and characters’ secrets are finally revealed, making it all the more exciting. The main conflict is the final battle between Darrak’s supporters and the Hellborn who is seeking to destroy Darrak’s bloodline and claim rule over all of Dragonath.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

There is absolutely nothing I refuse to write about, and I have included many controversial topics in my writing such as abortion, religion, rape, abuse, suicide, and global epidemics. Call To War alone deals with rape, abuse, global terrorism, and environmental destruction. I write about these issues because they’re relatable. They’re things that affect many of my readers and can help them think and reflect on their own lives and societies. I’m a huge proponent of talking about and facing issues and learning about both the issues and their consequences. Ignoring something doesn’t make it go away.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

About a year from writing the first word to holding the printed book in front of me.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

You have to be disciplined to be a writer, even if it’s not what you do full-time. It’s easy to get distracted by other things, particularly if you write at home. I write full-time, so a typical day for me starts at 8 in the morning and goes until 6 or 7 at night. I’ll take the morning to work on marketing, promotion, accounting, organizing personal appearances, and preparing for any upcoming events. The afternoons and evenings are set aside for writing or editing, depending on the stage of my work.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

The most difficult thing in writing Call To War was writing the love scene. I’d written rape scenes before, but never a love scene, which was challenging in itself, but the book as a whole is extremely dark and violent, with the characters being in dire situations. A love scene felt right between two of the characters, but writing it, and writing it so it wasn’t out of place with the rest of the story, proved difficult.

What do you love most about being an author?

Touching people in ways I never thought possible. It’s truly incredible to me that my books have helped people get through some of the most difficult times in their lives, and it’s the most rewarding feeling imaginable.

I had one reader write to me saying she had cancer. What got her through her chemotherapy sessions was visualizing my elf city of Silverden from Silevethiel. Every time she went in for treatment, she would picture herself in the world I’d created, and it would help to calm her enough so she could forget where she was and why she was there.

Another woman told me that the relationship between Irewen (a human) and Silevethiel (a lion) perfectly captured the love and friendship she had with her cat. Re-reading scenes from Silevethiel helped her recapture the memory of that bond after her pet’s death.

Hearing such personal stories of how my work has affected people and brought hope into their lives makes being an author tremendously worthwhile. They vanquish all of the frustrations that come with the job and are what make being an author amazing. They’re why I’ll continue to write until my last breath.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

My first book, The Lost Heir, was originally published through a small press. I hated the experience and the amount of control I lost. I have since self-published all of my books, including Call To War, and re-released The Lost Heir under my imprint, Purple Sun Press.

I am extremely happy with my decision to switch to self-publishing; however, it takes a great deal of work and money and can at times be quite frustrating. I essentially follow the process of a traditional publisher and hire editors, a cover designer, a printer, and a distributor so it is done professionally and available to all major stores/retailers, libraries, indie bookstores, and distributors. The best compliment I had when I was still unsure of whether I’d made the correct decision to self-publish was before I’d re-released The Lost Heir. Someone thought that was the self-published book and Silevethiel, the first one I’d actually self-published, was the one that had gone through a traditional publisher. It was at that moment I knew I’d made the right decision.

Where can we find you on the web?

Website: www.andioconnor.net

Twitter: www.twitter.com/oconnorandi

Facebook: www.facebook.com/oconnor.andi

Instagram: www.instagram.com/andi_oconnor

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Title: THE DISCOVERY
Author: Louis Kraft & Robert S. Goodman MD
Publisher: Createspace
Pages: 311
Genre: Legal Thriller

In THE DISCOVERY by Robert S. Goodman and Louis Kraft, a young obstetrician/gynecologist delivers a premature baby after attending a dinner party. The child survives the delivery, but complications lead to a malpractice lawsuit two decades later.

In 1952, a pregnant seventeen-year-old gives birth in a Los Angeles hospital. Two nurses attend to the young woman while they wait for the doctor on call to arrive for the delivery. Dr. Harry Chapman arrives at the hospital clearheaded but with alcohol on his breath. The premature baby is born blue and placed in an incubator. The nurses turn the oxygen to the level recommended to pediatricians for preemies the year before to prevent blindness. When the baby’s color doesn’t change, Harry instructs the nurses to turn the oxygen up to maximum. They protest, but Harry insists that the nurses comply to save the baby from brain damage or death.

In 1972, Greg Weston, a twenty-year-old paralegal meets a young woman who works with a renowned pediatrician. When she questions the attractive young man about his blindness, Greg reveals that his adoptive parents told him he was born blind. After agreeing to see the doctor Gail works for, Greg becomes aware that his blindness may have occurred as a result of physician error. Greg requests his medical records from the hospital and the adoption agency, and he finds that the hospital records tell a different story about what took place after his birth. In both records, Dr. Harry Chapman is indicated as the doctor who delivered him. Greg shares his findings with a partner in his law firm, and they build a case against Dr. Chapman based on fraudulent changes in the hospital records, which allows the statute of limitations to be thrown out.

After Harry receives word that he is being sued, his attorney advises him that the malpractice insurance he carried in 1952 will not cover even a fraction of the multimillion-dollar lawsuit. The stress and uncertainty of the case, along with the accusation of fraud, breaks Harry, leading him down a road of depression and alcohol dependence. As Harry’s wife, Helen, watches her husband deteriorate, she makes an unthinkable choice to put an end to the plaintiff’s case.

In THE DISCOVERY, the authors connect the lives of two individuals across two decades, exposing vulnerabilities, bitterness, and frailties. As the case moves forward, a key witness’s testimony alters the lives of both men.

In writing THE DISCOVERY, Goodman and Kraft’s intentions were to offer readers multidimensional characters with real-world problems and to bring awareness to the severe affect malpractice lawsuits can have on physicians’ professional and personal lives.

The Discovery is available at Amazon.

Book Excerpt:

An hour later Martin pulled into Harry’s driveway and parked next to Sid’s car. Harry, who rode shotgun, swung the door open and ran to the front door, where he fumbled with his keys. Sid opened the door and waved him inside.

“You seem like a man in a rush,” Sid said.

“Only to those who peer out of windows!” Harry pushed past Sid and rushed into the living room. He didn’t see Helen and moved into the kitchen. No Helen. Harry ran to the family room, but it was empty. He looked at the bar.

“Thirsty?” Sid said from behind him.

Harry ignored the comment. “Where’s Helen?”

“In your bedroom.”

Harry crossed to the couch in front of the TV set and slumped into it.

Sid sat next to him. “From a man in a hurry, it appears that you’ve suddenly run out of gas.”

“Look, pal, I know a hell of a lot more than you do.”

“Really? You don’t say, Harry. Well, I’ve got news for you. You don’t know your ass from a hole in the ground!”

Harry glared at Sid, as he formed a fist.

Sid smirked. “Go ahead and swing away.”

“What’s going on here?” Harry said as he relaxed his hand.

“Don’t ask me; ask your wife.”

Surprised, Harry leaned back on the couch. “What are you talking about?”

“I sure as hell know!”

“Tell me!”

“Nope. You want to know, you talk to Helen.”

“She won’t talk to me.”

“Maybe she will.”

“Tell me!”

“I promised Helen that I wouldn’t repeat what she told me. To anyone.

Harry had no idea what Sid spoke of and glared at him. “You know, sometimes you are a real pain in the ass.”

“And you’re a complete schmuck. Look Harry, you had better talk with her.” Harry didn’t move. “Now!”

Allen leaned into the room. “Is everything okay?”

“Yep,” Sid said, “couldn’t be better.”

“Then join us.”

“Soon.” He turned back to Harry. “For the last time Harry, get upstairs and talk to Helen.”

Harry stood but then glared at Sid.

“Harry, use your heart when you listen to her.”

“What are you talk—?” Suddenly frightened, Harry ran to the staircase and leaped up the steps two at a time. The door to their bedroom was closed. Harry opened it and stepped into the room. It was empty, but then the door to the bathroom opened and Helen appeared. Her hair was wet and dangled over her shoulders. She had an oversized towel wrapped around her body.

“What do you want?”

Meet the Authors

Author/historian Louis Kraft has focused his energy on producing work that highlights racism and the human experience of people who have put their lives on the line to prevent war. He has written articles for magazines, including Research Review and Wild West, as well as fiction (The Final Showdown) and nonfiction (Gatewood & Geronimo) books. Kraft returned to fiction writing when he collaborated with Robert S. Goodman on The Discovery.

Robert S. Goodman, MD has been in private practice since 1966, specializing in internal medicine. During his fifty-plus-year career, Goodman has been involved in hospital politics and served as chief of staff at Encino Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Goodman’s experience testifying as an expert witness in defense of hospitals and doctors contributed to his interest in writing The Discovery.

Visit their website at www.readthediscovery.com.

 

 

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U.L. Harper is a speculative fiction/horror author, influenced by magical realism. A former journalist from Long Beach, California, he now resides in the evergreen state of Washington with his wife. He is a soon-to-be father, and an avid Dodgers fan.

His latest book is the speculative fiction/horror/magical realism novel, THE SECRET DEATHS OF ARTHUR LOWE.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

About the Book:

While in the process of bringing his wife, Sandra, back to the living, Arthur journals about moments from his past that changed him.

During the journal writing, he rediscovers how, as an orphan, his ability to animate objects and people to life may have ultimately destroyed the lives of the few who grew close to him. The old stuffed teddy bear that helped him assemble puzzles when he was a child might have been too much of a secret for his adoptive mother to keep. His friend Quincy, who had abilities similar to his, might have been scared away by Arthur’s abilities. And his grade school teacher is still harboring a secret about his biological father that she can only hope to be true.

Once Sandra is alive again, things become more complicated. She claims Arthur is not who or what he thinks he is. Her ire shines a spotlight on the insidious but most likely true, unspoken nature of their relationship.

In the meantime, a mysterious smell envelopes the community—a stench so heinous it can be fatal. As the number of deaths from the stench mounts, Arthur must decide who to animate back to life and who remains dead.

The Secret Deaths of Arthur Lowe is available at AMAZON.

Would you call yourself a born writer?

In my opinion, I’ve always been in a process of becoming an author. It’s how I observe things, and how I read. It’s always been there. As a matter of fact, I have two middle initials and can’t think of another reason to have them accept for a writing name. My middle names are Uriah Lejan. U.L. So, yeah, I was born as a writer, I suppose.

What was your inspiration for The Secret Deaths of Arthur Lowe? A number of things, including how Arthur was originally going to be a super hero. After that didn’t work, his relationship with his wife is what did it for me. It was going to be a love story, but it turned into something else.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

For some reason, I like to talk about depression. The core of most of my stories are the worst things that have happened to the character and how they deal with it. The latest is no different. Arthur deals with worst case scenario more than once in his life, and everything is actually about how he handles it.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

I’ve been writing this one for a while. It’s had many iterations, and I’m not talking about just drafting. It was originally being outlined as a comic book. It did nothing but change since then. Let’s say three years and some change. Up to this point, these are the hardest 210 pages I’ve done. Then somebody comes along and reads it in few hours. I guess that’s a good thing.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I’m not disciplined. I can get sidetracked by most things. I don’t really keep a schedule. I just make sure I get whatever I’m doing done in a timely manner. A lot of times when I’m being professional and writing because it’s the time of day for me to write, man, I have to change all that up anyway. I’m far more focused after say the second draft. Then the timing makes plenty more sense, and from there I still don’t have a schedule, but I write for longer periods of time. I become aggressive with the storytelling at that point.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Most challenging? From a technical standpoint, retaining tension. Because a lot of it is told in flashback it’s easy to release tension, which I didn’t necessarily want to do. So how I do that is pretty interesting, I think. From a character angle, creating sympathy for Arthur and another character became a chore. They’re not obviously people to root for, no matter how interesting. Then there are the women in the story. These are strong women, but they don’t come from a place of strength.

What do you love most about being an author?

Um, right now there are no obvious pluses. However, I do like the process of writing. You know, getting a glass of whiskey and some chocolate, turning on some bebop jazz, going to the screen and just killing it.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I self published. I really wanted an agent but I just don’t think this story or any that I do have easy to find markets. For instance, Arthur Lowe is not a horror story, but beta readers definitely said that can be the case. It dips into magical realism but that’s not at its core. The tone is of literature, but when you get into, man, it’s just not that. On the other hand, I the process was fantastic. I had my beta readers all ready to go. I paid a proofreader. Paid the cover artist, who I’ve used for years now. That went really well. The revision process was profound as usual. The marketing seems to take a bit of leg work and a few dollars but, oh well.

Where can we find you on the web?

I actually don’t mind if you email me ulharper1@gmail.com. @ulharper is my twitter handle. And on facebook, search for the U.L. Harper fan club. My new website will be here shortly. Got to get that done.

 

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