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Children of the Knight banner

We’re pleased to interview Michael J. Bowler here at The Dark Phantom today!  Michael is on a blog tour to promote his new YA novel, Children of the Knight.  Welcome Michael!

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Michael-Bowler-4-211x300Michael is an award-winning author who grew up in San Rafael, California. He majored in English and Theatre at Santa Clara University and earned a master’s in film production and a second master’s in Special Education. He partnered with two friends as producer, writer, and/or director on several films, most notably “Fatal Images,” “Dead Girls,” “Hell Spa” (later re-edited and titled “Club Dead”), “Things” and “Things II.”

”A Boy and His Dragon, published in 2011, is an urban fantasy about a lonely boy in 1970 who discovers both a living dragon and his own true nature, a nature that makes him the most dangerous boy on earth.

“A Matter of Time,” a Silver Award winner from Reader’s Favorite, was published in 2012. It is a real-world-grounded story of an almost impossible loop in time that leads to undying love and unforgettable heartache.

He has also been a volunteer Big Brother to seven different boys over 29 years with the Catholic Big Brothers Big Sisters program and a volunteer within the juvenile justice system in Los Angeles for 28 years.  He is a passionate advocate for the fair treatment of children and teens in California, something that is sorely lacking in this state.

“Children of the Knight,” his most current novel, is likely to be controversial in its themes and conclusions. Those children society tends to reject or ignore or abuse or marginalize, who come in all shapes and sizes – black and white and brown and Asian and Pacific Islander and gang affiliated and gay and straight and those who are confused about their sexuality – are the subject of this book, and the story depicts an adult society that tells these kids, in various ways, that they are of no real value.

You can visit Michael’s website at www.michaeljbowler.com.

Book description:

Children of the KnightAccording to legend, King Arthur is supposed to return when Britain needs him most. So why does a man claiming to be the once and future king suddenly appear in modern-day Los Angeles?

This charismatic young Arthur creates a new Camelot within the City of Angels to lead a crusade of unwanted kids against an adult society that discards and ignores them. Under his banner of equality, every needy child is welcome, regardless of race, creed, sexual orientation, or gang affiliation.

With the help of his amazing First Knight, homeless fourteen-year-old Lance, Arthur transforms this ragtag band of rejected children and teens into a well-trained army-the Children of the Knight. Through his intervention, they win the hearts and minds of the populace at large, and gain a truer understanding of themselves and their worth to society. But seeking more rights for kids pits Arthur and the children squarely against the rich, the influential, and the self-satisfied politicians who want nothing more than to maintain the status quo.

Can right truly overcome might? Arthur’s hopeful young knights are about to find out, and the City of Angels will never be the same.

Purchase links:

http://www.amazon.com/Children-Knight-Michael-J-Bowler/dp/1623806550/ref=pd_rhf_ee_p_img_1_NKGB

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/children-of-the-knight-michael-j-bowler/1115751033?ean=9781623806552

Interview:

Would you call yourself a born writer?

I’d say so. I’ve always loved reading stories and making up stories and telling stories. As a child growing up I was hearing impaired, shy, and rather introverted and didn’t have a huge number of friends. Books gave me somewhere to go, places I knew I’d never be able to go in real life, and they sparked my already fertile imagination. Sometimes they made me laugh and sometimes cry, but well-written books always got me caught up with the characters and situations. I decided even before high school that I wanted to try my hand at moving others emotionally through storytelling the way I had so often been moved.

What was your inspiration for Children of the Knight?

I dedicated the book to all of the amazing kids I’ve worked with over the years and they are truly the inspiration for this story, especially the incarcerated kids who clued me into a world of almost impossible-to-believe degradations perpetrated against children in this society. Sadly, every terrible act committed against kids in my book is one I’ve heard from someone in real life. And yet these same abused, abandoned, neglected, tortured kids who really should have given up years before, inspired me through their ability to rise above their pasts and still possess hope for a better future. Amazing!

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I like to explore themes of honor and decency and doing what’s right, rather than following the main media mantra these days of “it’s all about me.” Sadly, in our society today, most kids growing up witness and are taught self-centered behaviors, and thus they think life should be all about them. Selfishness in the adult population is what’s bringing our society down, so I like characters facing situations wherein they must make really hard moral choices, like what’s right versus what’s easy. Teens today have precious few role models in any walk of life that exemplify this model.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

The outline for this story began a LONG time ago, but I only sat down to write it in earnest last summer. It took about a month or two for the first draft and then endless tweaking and revising for several months thereafter.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

Yes. Since I no longer have a 9-5 job, my job is writing. I’m usually up early in the morning, eat breakfast, and then write for most of the day until maybe 3 or 4. Then I go to the gym where I work out with and train teenagers (see how YA is a perfect fit? HA!) and after the gym I go home and write some more. Depending upon my weekend plans, this will be my typical schedule then too. When I have a story to get out of my system, it’s easy to be disciplined because I want to finish it.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Juggling a large cast of characters and making sure to work each one in as thoroughly as possible. Some of them become more prominent in the sequels than in this one, but it’s always a challenge to have a large cast. Once in a while I’d realize I placed the same kid in two different locations at the same time, or forgot about some other kid for several chapters. Ha! There are also a large number of adult characters and they had to be given sufficient “screen time” as well.

What do you love most about being an author?

I love being an author because I love the idea of touching someone else’s heart and mind through my writing the same way my heart and mind were so often touched, and even influenced, as a kid growing up. If I can achieve that through my writing, all the sweat and drama of writing the book and getting it published will have been worth it.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

My first two books were self-published through two different companies. I enjoyed the experience, but also found it difficult because I don’t really have anyone who will read my stuff for errors or typos or just continuity problems, and thus mistakes found their way to the final product. Also, the marketing is all on me because there is no company that will benefit financially from marketing it themselves. This book, Children of the Knight, was released by a real YA publisher and it’s been an amazingly positive and joyful experience. These people have been fantastic and creative and incredibly helpful all along the way and I can’t say enough good things about the company or the people. The editing process was painstakingly thorough and hopefully no mistakes actually made it into the printed book. I don’t plan to read it to find out however. Ha! There’s probably more money to be made in self-publishing, but more expense, as well. If all publishers are as amazing as Harmony Ink I’d say go with a real company.

Where can we find you on the web?

www.michaeljbowler.com

Facebook: michaeljbowlerauthor

Blog: SirLanceSays.wordpress.com

Twitter: BradleyWallaceM

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Traveling for Love banner

Becky DueBecky Due is the new voice of women’s fiction. She has the courage, honesty and writing style for today’s busy women, and she does not cringe away from hard issues. She will leave you feeling strong, self-confident, independent, and in control of your life.

Her books have won, and been finalists in, several independent competitions including the 2011 National Indie Excellence Awards, 2010 Indie Excellence Awards and the 2009 IPPY Awards.

Her novels are not the same story with different characters; she has the ability to cross genres from light-hearted romance to heart-racing suspense to keep her readers entertained and inspired.

Becky has been a guest on national TV and radio programs, and the subject of numerous newspaper and national magazine articles for empowering women with her books. She has served as a guest speaker at Women’s Resource Centers, Shelters, Colleges and High Schools throughout the United States. Becky has had extensive training at Victim Services, worked the 24-Hour Sexual Assault Crisis-Line and was a Victim’s Advocate where she offered one-on-one assistance and support to rape victims. In 2007, she started Women Going Forward, the first national women’s telephone support group, which ran for almost two years. After receiving much recognition for her books, Becky’s focus turned back to her writing and empowering women with her novels.

Her latest book is the women’s fiction, Traveling for Love: Searching for Self, Hoping for Love.

Visit her website at www.BeckyDue.com.

Connect & Socialize with Becky:

TWITTER | FACEBOOK

 

Traveling for Love lgWould you call yourself a born writer?

Yes. Writing is my life. I didn’t realize that writing was such an important part of me until my late twenties, although there were signs along the way. I wish I had listened to my teachers (and my gut) when I was younger. I remember, in seventh grade, thinking, “Maybe I should be a writer.” I’m not sure why I waited so long, maybe I needed to accumulate some life experiences… and I have. J

What was your inspiration for Traveling for Love: Searching for Self, Hoping for Love?

I hate to admit this, but I wasn’t feeling good about myself in my own marriage so I created Amanda and I went on the journey with her. I wanted to write a romance, something uplifting, but romance novels seem so far from reality.I needed her, as a forty year old, to go through what many of us go through in our twenties. She needed some heartache before discovering who she was and what she really wanted.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I love all topics of women’s issues. I think most women are such nurturing givers that we often forget to take care of ourselves and give back to ourselves. All of my novels cover issues of empowerment, and encourage women to make themselves a priority.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

Well, because I’m not a multi-tasker, once I know the basics of my storyline and I’m ready to write it, I write. I do nothing else. But like all of my books, Traveling for Love took years of experiences. I loved writing this story, it was a fun and crazy rollercoaster. Fortunately, through the process I learned a lot about myself, my choices and my marriage.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I was disciplined while writing Traveling for Love, but I have to say, I’m struggling a little with the novel I’m working on now. I took a year off from writing because I was going through some life changes and I’m trying to get back into the swing of things. But typically, on a good writing day, I wake up around four or five in the morning, make coffee and start writing before I have my first sip. I lose all sense of time until around ten o’clock at night when I’m exhausted and force myself to go to bed. On my uninspired days, like what I’m currently going through, I find distractions—I can’t write today; I have to cut back the shrubs, clean the basement or buy a bike—seriously, the excuses I come up with are ridiculous. I do think off days are good for me, and during those days I’m writing in my mind, taking notes, talking into my phone recorder and putting my ring on my other finger to remember some important point I need to make in the story. I’m convinced that I can’t have good writing days if I don’t have a few unproductive writing days.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Amanda, the main character, changed a few times—I changed her age and some of her choices. I wanted her to struggle with love, career and her truth, as so many of us do.In the beginning of the story, which is the ending of her marriage, Amanda doesn’t know who she is or what she wants and it takes her some time, a couple different men and some life experiences to figure that out.

What do you love most about being an author?

I love everything about being an author, even the torturous parts. I love creating stories and I especially love when people read and enjoy my stories. There is nothing better in the world. Though I have many friends, I’m kind of a loner, somewhat introverted. To me finding my passion and becoming an author was all about finding the place where I fit in. Being an author allows me to honor my introspective personality.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

It seems I did everything backward. I started by looking for an agent and going the traditional route with my first novel, The Gentlemen’s Club. I had 8 interested agents but they alltold me to have the manuscript professionally edited. I couldn’t afford a professional editor so my book sat on a shelf until I was in a better financial position. A couple years had passed and I didn’t want to start over again, looking for an agent, so I began working with an editor, started my own publishing company, and published several books. Traveling for Love is the first book published by another company. Because of the changing times in publishing, this has been a wonderful move for me. Luckily, I maintain all the rights and can control the price point of the ebooks, which I happily made available for only 99¢. I’ve also published all of my novels on audio; I love to listen to novels while I’m stuck in traffic. Although I have moved toward the eproducts,loving the quick ease of receiving a book I want to read within seconds, my books are available in paperback. I still love to hold a book in my hands. I’ve never been happier with the business side of writing because I’m able to focus on my favorite part—writing.

Where can we find you on the web?

I’m on Twitter and Facebook, I have a website with great information and I also blog empowering, inspiring postsa couple times a week. Oh, and if you join my Facebook page you’ll automatically receive my blog posts and you’re automatically entered to win free books in our monthly giveaway.

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The Knights of Galaria  banner

We welcome today O.S. Gill, author of the new sci-fi fantasy ‘THE KNIGHTS OF GALARIA: THE CRYSTALS OF POWER.’  O.S. is on a virtual book tour and is stopping off at The Dark Phantom! O.S.  grew up on the Caribbean island of Barbados. He was educated at The Lodge School, a 300-year-old former British boarding school and the second oldest learning institution on the island. A certified information technology professional, he has worked for The Banks Holdings Limited, a local conglomerate that owns the local brewery (Banks Beer) and Coca-Cola manufacturing plant for fourteen years. A Systems Analyst, he has been positioned in various capacities, primarily dealing with sales and distribution, as well as the sourcing and implementation of new technologies to further business efficiency.

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O.S. GillWould you call yourself a born writer?

Yes, I would call myself a born writer.

What was your inspiration for The Knights of Galaria?

Well, I have always wanted to write a novel. When I attended a pop culture convention a few years ago, I got the inspiration to finally be disciplined enough to not only start, but complete a novel. So over the course of the next few months I carefully crafted the world and the storyline that I would write about, and that’s how I ended up writing The Knights of Galaria.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I like to explore adventure, friendship and the triumph of good over evil.

The Knights of GalariaHow long did it take you to complete the novel?

It took me eight months end to end.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

For the most part in writing this novel I was. Although, there was a time when inspiration just was not hitting me, and I didn’t write a single word for almost two weeks. In a typical writing day I would put in about three hours work or about five or six pages.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Finding the time during my schedule.

What do you love most about being an author?

Having people read my work. It is a very rewarding feeling.

What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I self-published. It was a lot of leg work, as is probably expected. I am very happy with the decision; I believe that self-publishing will play a much bigger role in works to come.

Where can we find you on the web?

You can find me at my website www.osgill.com or follow me on Twitter @galarianation

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ImageKim Antieau has written many novels, short stories, poems, and essays. Her work has appeared in numerous publications, both in print and online, including The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Asimov’s SF, The Clinton Street Quarterly, The Journal of Mythic Arts, EarthFirst!, Alternet, Sage Woman, and Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine. She was the founder, editor, and publisher of Daughters of Nyx: A Magazine of Goddess Stories, Mythmaking, and Fairy Tales. Her work has twice been short-listed for the Tiptree Award, and has appeared in many Best of the Year anthologies. Critics have admired her “literary fearlessness” and her vivid language and imagination. She has had nine novels published. Her first novel, The Jigsaw Woman, is a modern classic of feminist literature. Kim lives in thePacific Northwest with her husband, writer Mario Milosevic.

Her latest book is Her Frozen Wild.

Learn more about Kim and her writing at www.kimantieau.com.

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About Her Frozen Wild

Scientists in the Altai inSiberiauncover the 2,500 year old frozen mummy of a tattooed priestess or shaman. This mummy has the same mtDNA (mitochondrialDNA) as American archaeologist Ursula Smith whose mother disappeared inSiberia30 years earlier. Ursula travels from theU.S.toSiberiato unravel the mystery of the “lady” and meets Sergei Ivanovich Polyakov, a Russian doctor who graciously invites her into his home. After they become lovers, she discovers he has the same tattoos on his body as the tattooed lady. He tells a disbelieving Ursula that they have met before and she is destined to save the ancient People, considered as devils by some and shape-changing gods by others. A shaman takes Ursula to one of the sacred timeless caves where Ursula’s mother supposedly disappeared. When Ursula allows the shaman to tattoo her, she is thrown back in time where she must unlock the mystery of the People and their link to her past in order to save them and Sergei—even if it costs her her life.

Interview

Why don’t you begin by telling us a little about yourself?

I live in a small town inWashingtonStatein the beautiful Columbia River Gorge with my husband, writer Mario Milosevic. I grew up inMichigan, and Mario and I met atMichiganStateUniversitywhen we both attended a six-week writing workshop there one summer. We’ve lived out West for nearly thirty years and consider it our home now. We like to get out into the woods as much as we can and hike. Once a year we go toArizonaon a writing retreat. That helps us survive all the rain!

When did you decide you wanted to become an author?

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I can remember. When I was in first grade, I won an art prize for something I had drawn. I got a lot of praise for that. It was very exciting for a six-year-old, but I remember thinking that I probably couldn’t make a living as an artist so I should become a writer instead. To this day I have no idea where a six-year-old would come up with something like that! And I now know from experience that making a living as a writer isn’t any easier than it is for an artist.

ImageDo you have another job besides writing?

Yes, I’m also a librarian. I was a branch manager, which meant I ran a public library. Now I’m a selector. This means I get to buy books for a living. For a long time I selected all the adult fiction for our library district. Now I select all the young adult books and graphic novels, for all ages.

Were you an avid reader as a child? What type of books did you enjoy reading?

I was book crazy. I read everything and anything. We had lots of history books in the house, and I gobbled those up. We also got mail order books where there’d be two books in one. They were so cool because you’d read one and flip it over and there’d be another cover and another book. I loved the classics: Jungle Book, Wizard of Oz, Swiss Family Robinson, Gulliver’s Travels, Little Women. I read Charles Dickens, Alexander Dumas, Jules Verne. I also read any horse book I could find. I loved anything that was strange and wonderful, but I didn’t really discover science fiction until I was in college. I’m not sure why. Maybe my library segregated the science fiction so I never saw it. In any case, I was eclectic in my tastes. I read pretty much anything my parents brought into the house or anything I could get from the library. I liked adventure stories. I loved the Black Stallion series and the Narnia series.

Tell us a bit about your latest book, and what inspired you to write such a story.

I read a National Geographic magazine article about the discovery of a mummy in Siberia. They called her the “ice maiden.” She was tattooed, and she was buried with a conical hat and other items that made archaeologists believe she was a priestess or shaman. As soon as I read the article, I knew I would have to write about her. That’s when Her Frozen Wild was born. In my book, archaeologists uncover a frozen tattooed female mummy in the Altai inSiberia, too. But when they take a DNA sample and put it in the worldwide DNA database, they discover her DNA matches almost perfectly with Ursula Smith’s DNA, aPortland archaeologist who is peripherally involved in the project. Nobody can explain how this could have happened since Ursula is inPortland and has never been toSiberia, and the mummy has been encased in ice for 2,500 years. Despite being terrified of flying, Ursula travels toSiberia to unravel the mystery of the “lady.” She meets Sergei Ivanovich Polyakov, a Russian doctor who invites her into his home. After they become lovers, she discovers Sergei has the same tattoos on his body as the tattooed lady. He tells a disbelieving Ursula that they have met before and she is destined to save the ancient People, considered as devils by some and shape-changing gods by others. Ursula can’t imagine she is destined for anything, but she goes with Sergei and a shaman to one of the sacred timeless caves where her mother supposedly vanished thirty years earlier. When Ursula allows the shaman to tattoo her, she is thrown back in time where she has to unlock the mystery of the People and their link to her past in order to save them and Sergei.

Did your book require a lot of research?

Yes! I probably did more research for this novel than I ever have. I generally enjoy research. I’m a librarian and a writer, so research comes naturally to me. But I had to learn a lot about a lot of topics for Her Frozen Wild. Archaeology is an avocation of mine, but I’m not an archaeologist. I hung out with an archaeologist for a while and interviewed her. Of course I learned everything I could about the Siberian ice mummies, and I kept in touch with an archaeologist who had traveled to the Altai and researched the mummies. I learned as much as I could about the Scythians, who lived in that part of the world. Some scholars have theorized that the Scythians were the source of the stories of the Amazons. I learned all about bear mythology, too. In fact, my husband and I spent some time with a modern-day Siberian shaman and became part of the Bear Clan. I also learned everything I could about cave art, tattooing, shape-shifting legends, alchemy, and Russian flora and fauna.

They say authors have immensely fragile egos… How would you handle negative criticism or a negative review?

Some of the best advice I ever got about writing was from writer Algis Budrys. He said we should ignore reviews. “You’re never as bad as they say,” he said, “and you’re never as good as they say.” I do try to ignore reviews. Fortunately, most professional reviewers have been kind to my work. It does hurt when you find something that seems harsh and cruel from a reader on some website. I try to remember that it’s just one person’s opinion.

When writing, what themes do you feel passionate about?

I seem to write a lot about finding home. I didn’t realize this for years. Writers are often oblivious to their own themes! Then I discovered that I had ended three of my novels with the word “home.” I tried to figure out what that meant, but I’m still not! I have been trying to find a place to call home all of my adult life, a place where I feel valued, where people live in harmony and kindness with one another and the environment. I do know most of my books are about how we as humans live together on this Earth.

Do you have any unusual writing quirks?

I can’t start writing a novel until I have a title. I don’t like this particular quirk! I usually come up with a title fairly quickly, but there have been times when I just couldn’t get one I liked. If I can’t get a title, I can’t start the book. This is very frustrating. I am trying to get over this little quirk.

What is your opinion about critique groups? What words of advice would you offer a novice writer who is joining one? Do you think the wrong critique group can ‘crush’ a fledgling writer?

I’m afraid I’m wary of critique groups. I was fortunate enough to go to college where I took many writing classes. This was a great foundation because I learned a lot about technique. Teachers were able to tell me what was working and what wasn’t necessarily working. The downside to that was that my writing teachers didn’t like or understand anything genre. Once I wrote a science fiction story, and my writing professor wrote in the margins that he didn’t know what to say about it. “If you must write this sort of thing, I suppose it’s all right,” he wrote. I was astonished! So I do think it’s good to have people read what you’re writing, especially when you’re first starting out. But writing groups can be harmful. As writers, we need to develop our own voices. We can’t develop Joan Didion’s voice or Stephen King’s voice; we need our own. I’m not sure you can develop your own voice when a whole chorus of people are telling you what they think you’re doing wrong. People in these groups often start writing for the group in a way that will get approval. The work coming from a particular critique groups starts sounding alike. I have been a part of some writing groups that were helpful. These were the ones where we met as peers not to critique one another but to share our work, if we wanted, and to talk about our process and how we were doing living the writing life.

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A former journalist, Kellyann’s interest in Middle Eastern myth and legend stems from her stint as a Managing Editor of Publications for the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C. She is a published author of several genie romance novellas. One book, Angels & Genies, was included in a collection for which Charlaine Harris wrote the foreword. Kellyann lives in Pennsylvania with her husband, three children, and a jaunty terrier named Djin-Djin.

Her latest book is The Genie Ignites.

Visit her website at www.kfzuzulo.com.

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Blog | Boroughs Publishing Group | Official Tour Page

Interview:               

Do you have another job besides writing?

I work as a freelance editor when I’m not writing…or promoting a new book (which can turn into a fulltime job.) You could say I’m a language matchmaker: I enjoy putting wandering commas in their place, reuniting split infinitives and, basically, grooming sentences so they make a beautiful story.

How would you describe your creative process while writing this book? Was it stream-of-consciousness writing, or did you first write an outline?

The Genie Ignites, like most books I write, started with an outline. I had a general idea of the story in my head; I knew the beginning and the end. Then I work through chapter by chapter with a glimpse of what I want to happen. Of course, once I dive into the story, the characters frequently have ideas of their own of what they want to happen. I’m flexible.

Did your book require a lot of research?

The Genie Ignites required a lot of research. I wanted to be accurate about the Middle Eastern world where genies are an accepted part of lore, both in the past and in today’s world. I’d read a lot about the legends of the jinn, how they started and how they’re perceived today. I also subscribe to some archaeological magazines, which provide great insight into how the ancient world looked and how the people lived when Zubis first fell in love with the priestess Lina. Then I drew that forward into a modern world, which is where my own experience came in.

What was your goal when writing this book?

I wanted to create a story where a reader could imagine genies and humans living side-by-side. Genies are a very real part of the mythology in many parts of the world. They’re thought to be similar to humans but with abilities we can only imagine. There are even rules about the extent of interaction between the two races. What if a genie and a human tried to make their own way together, in spite of the obstacles? That’s what this story is about.

Who is your target audience?

My audience will be anyone who loves a good story that combines romance, suspense and humor. A tale that travels to exotic locations and dips into unique customs and styles. But, especially, fans of paranormal romance will really love this book.

Describe your working environment.

My office has a lot of windows, bud-green walls, and a tabletop fountain. The sound of gurgling water transports me to the midspace between reality and imagination where a writer lives. I have a small Bose stereo to play my iPod, which is loaded with Middle Eastern music, Enya, Loreena McKennitt, and a bunch of jazz. There’s a collection of clay oil lamps from theMiddle Eastdisplayed on my desk. I’m waiting for the day when a mist begins to seethe from one of the spouts. I won’t run from the room…promise.

Do you write non-stop until you have a first draft, or do you edit as you move along?

I write non-stop, and I mean non-stop, until the book is finished. Up at 5 a.m.for a few hours, take care of the kids and my husband in between, then back to work. When the muse has me by the hand, they are very understanding. Each morning when I check back in with the story, I do a cursory read-through of the previous scene and I’ll make grammatical changes. But the heavy edits wait until that first draft is finished. This is a piece of advice I once got in a writers workshop: Get it out. Then, fix it up.

What is the best writing advice you’ve ever received?

Find your voice. That is, be who you are as a writer, not who you think you should be. Finding your voice can take years, but it’ll be worth it. 

Do you have a website/blog where readers may learn more about you and your work?

My website is www.kfzuzulo.com with a blog at www.kfzuzulo.com/blog. Readers can also find me on twitter and Facebook at KFZuzulo.

 

 

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