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Posts Tagged ‘doug hewitt’

doug-hewittD.A. Hewitt is an award-winning author of four novels and over a hundred short stories. One novel was awarded a gold medal from the Independent Publishers Book Awards for best regional fiction. He attributes his success to hard work, honing a skill and providing an outlet for his passion for writing.

Born in Michigan, he lived for 25 years in North Carolina before returning to live in his home state. In addition to enjoying sky diving and mountain climbing, he is a proud veteran of the US Marine Corps and has earned a degree in mathematics.

Mr. Hewitt admits to a fascination with the work of Carl Jung and of the Gnostic religion. He’d always thought intertwining these topics in a science fiction novel was a stretch, but one day the storyline of Dominion came to him. He wrote the novel in a stream of consciousness. “It makes sense, tapping into the collective unconscious,” Mr. Hewitt says, “very much like Carl Jung might have predicted.”

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About the Book:

It’s the year 2075. Lunar mining and processing facilities have prospered near the lunar south pole, where the Moon’s largest city, Valhalla, rests on the rim of the Shackleton Crater.

dominionDominion Off-Earth Resources has beaten the competition into space and is ready to establish its monopoly with the opening of the orbiting space resort Dominion. But Pettit Space Industries has a secret plan to emerge as a major contender in the commercialization of space. The upstart company is training the first space rescue squad at a secluded off-grid site in Barrow, Alaska.

The rescue squad gets nearly more than it can handle when its first mission involves the Pope, who’s traveling to the Moon to establish the Lunar See. During the rescue attempt, they discover Earth is imperiled by an asteroid large enough to cause mass extinction. Using the unique skills taught during their training, skills emphasized by the great psychoanalyst Carl Jung, these Jungi Knights must elevate their game if they are to save both the Earth and the Pope—while not getting killed in the process.

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Would you call yourself a born writer?

Yes! But in all honesty, it wasn’t until the seventh grade. That’s when I wrote a 57-page short story for an English assignment. The goal was for to fill out 1 page. Maybe 2. I wrote 57. Well, that was an excellent exercise in which a young 12-year-old realizes he is destined to be an author. It was a self-realization.

What was your inspiration for Dominion?

I asked myself the question, what if the colonization of the Moon brought about the need for a space rescue team, and that rescue team practiced unique skills that were honed by psychological means. Could that be the birth of a sort of Jedi Knights? Now, my guys (and gals) are called the Jungi Knights after the great psychoanalyst Carl Jung, so although there’s a resemblance, it’s purely coincidental.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I typically go for big themes like saving the planet, saving human-kind, or saving a group of people from certain death. It’s the bad guys I find interesting. Why do they do such things? I try to explore the darker sides of the human psyche.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

I thought I was finished after a year, but it took two and a half years. I added 20,000 words and a big finish.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I try to write at least 30 minutes a day. What happens is, though, when I sit down to write, I get very much into my writing and will go on for hours and hours. I write every day. I’m very disciplined about that.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

I introduce the Process Map of Consciousness in Dominion and the hardest part was not getting too preachy or didactic. The Process Map has very much helped me out in my day-to-day activities and I wanted to share with others so they could benefit from the work I’ve done.

What do you love most about being an author?

The act of writing itself. I’d either die or go nuts if I didn’t write.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I went with small press. I came close to getting a literary agent for this book, and I think an agent is necessary for getting signed with any sizeable publisher. And so I went with a small press, Double Dragon. They’ve been very professional.

Where can we find you on the web?

www.StinkyUniverse.com

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My latest novel, The Dead Guy, is a murder mystery set in Detroit. Why Detroit? Two reasons. I was born and raised in a Detroit suburb, so I knew the area well and could write about it convincingly. The second reason was that I couldn’t think of a better place for a main character who investigates car insurance scams for a living. After all, Detroit is known as the Motor City.

Of course, my main character, Jack Thigpen, gets pulled into a murder investigation when his best friend gets shot and killed. And actually, Jack was the target. Not only did I want to add a lot of irony to The Dead Guy, I wanted to add a lot of twists and turns to the plot.

For someone who starts out writing novels in the mystery genre, the murder mystery will follow certain conventions. The writer learns these conventions and writes the storyline accordingly. But what if the mystery genre hasn’t been the main focus of your writing? That’s what I faced when I started writing The Dead Guy.

I’ve written mostly in the horror and suspense genres. And as I point out sometimes, when a black cat appears in a horror novel, the implications are totally different than when one shows up in a mystery. But I was determined to write a straight-up mystery with no supernatural elements. But then, how do I create tension? It’s easy when there’s a monster lumbering toward town. Everyone fears monsters. But what do people fear in a mystery novel?

The answer I came up with was death. Everyone fears death, which is why I gave my main character a fatal disease in the first chapter. It’s a fast-acting disease, too, which adds to the tension. In a way, it’s a ticking bomb, and the mystery has to be solved before the disease renders my main character dead.
The first reviews are in, and they’ve all been good so far. The common thread is that The Dead Guy is a fast-paced mystery. I think that stems from my history as a horror writer. I want readers to want to turn the page to find out what happens.

With The Dead Guy, I think I’ve succeeded.

The Book:

Jack Thigpen works in Detroit, nicknamed The Motor City, the perfect place for a fraud investigator who specializes in car insurance scams. He is on a case he believes is a typical, low-level crime, but it quickly turns into a situation with ominous international consequences. Ironically, as he is targeted for death frontcoveronlywithbylinejpeg-185x255because of his investigation, Jack is diagnosed with a fatal disease that is untreatable, a disease that will end his life within months. And instead of killing Jack, the hit man shoots Jack’s best friend. Struggling to come to terms with his impending death, Jack vows to track down his friend’s killer.

Jack plunges into the world of corrupt car dealerships, chop shops, and fraudulent auto repair shops. He is soon swept into the darkness of Detroit’s criminal underbelly to uncover the truth about power struggles within organized crime rings. Death is staring him in the face, but Jack doesn’t back down. He pushes ahead, plowing through perilous roadblocks planted by his enemies, propelling himself toward the finish line and a teeth-gritting, heart-pounding conclusion.

Bio:

Doug Hewitt was born and raised near Detroit, Michigan and now lives in North Carolina. Along the way, he did a four-year stint in the Marine Corps and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics. He has been writing short stories for over 20 years and has been getting them published for most of that time, with over 80 stories in print. His stories have appeared in anthologies such as The Dead Inn and 100 Wicked Little Witch Stories. He has appeared in the premier issue of Apex Digest and has seen his chapbook, Slipstream, published by Scrybe Press.

He turned his attention to longer works and had his first novel SPEAR published in 2002. The Midwest Book Review calls SPEAR “a thrilling and deftly crafted novel.” After being remarried in 2004, he and his wife, Robin, founded HewittsBooks.com. In addition to authoring a non-fiction parenting book, The Practical Guide To Weekend Parenting, Doug and Robin teamed up to write The Joyous Gift of Grandparenting.

Doug returned to his original passion, writing fiction, and wrote The Dead Guy, which St. Martins author Lynn Chandler-Willis calls a “high-octane, pedal-to-the-metal ride through the criminal underbelly of the automotive world.” You can visit Doug Hewitt and read a free PDF chapter of The Dead Guy at www.HewittsBooks.com.

www.HewittsBooks.com (download the first chapter free here!)
www.TwoHewitts.blogspot.com (where I blog about book promotion)
www.ParentsWrite.com (where I blog about parenting)

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