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Robert Parker is a new exciting voice, a married father of two, who lives in a village close to Manchester, UK. He has both a law degree and a degree in film and media production, and has worked in numerous employment positions, ranging from solicitor’s agent (essentially a courtroom gun for hire), to a van driver, to a warehouse order picker, to a commercial video director. He currently writes full time, while also making time to encourage new young readers and authors through readings and workshops at local schools and bookstores. In his spare time he adores pretty much all sport, boxing regularly for charity, loves fiction across all mediums, and his glass is always half full.

His latest book is the crime/thriller, A WANTED MAN.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

Would you call yourself a born writer?

No, I wouldn’t at all. I’d say I was a fairly imaginative kid that was exposed to lots of fun stories when he was young, and all I ever wanted to do from then was the same thing.

What was your inspiration for A WANTED MAN?

All sorts of things, in truth! Eighties action movies, fatherhood, the futility of war, disillusionment with government, crime stories, my home city of Manchester, mob movies. It started as a terrible action movie screenplay when I was 16, and I went back to it when I was 30 and thought ‘hey, I can do something with this finally!’.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

The ordinary smashing up against the fantastic. The real versus the outlandish. Normal splashed with amazing. Anything that surprises and satisfies in equal measure. Aside from that, I find myself writing about fatherhood a lot, but with two young kids and a third imminent, I suppose being a dad is never far from my daily thoughts!

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

Well, after I picked it back up as a screenplay out of the drawer, and started a first draft, it was 6-7 weeks. Then after that a further three years of rewrites, so that draft 46 is the one you have in your hands.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I try to be as strict with myself as I can, but I love the fact that being a writer lets be spend a lot of time with my kids, and they always come first. But usually, I’ll be up early doors with the sprogs, they’ll go off to school, then it’s coffee and writing the rest of the day, breaking for lunch, the gym and errands. Family time again 5 until 7pm, then if we’ve got a quiet evening planned, I’m straight back at it until my eyes fuzz.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

The patience I suppose. I’m fit to burst with my next book, and the next and the next, so that when I kept having to rewrite (and then because it’s actually a book and it takes a fair bit of time to read) it felt like it took longer and longer to get there. But now I’m so glad it did, because the book is literally the best I could make it, thanks to all the time it took me to get it here.

What do you love most about being an author?

The ability to create everyday, and the joy and freedom that comes with that. That and the fact that it lets me spend a lot of time with my family, which is a complete blessing I know how lucky I am to have.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I self-published originally, until I hooked up with my agent, then we went hunting a publisher. Then it was a question of taking the best offer. I’d have got nowhere if I didn’t self-publish though, and would recommend it to anyone who is struggling to find an audience like I was. I loved that process, and I really enjoyed the thrill of self-publishing – people look down on it, but I know it was how I got started. I’ll always be grateful to it.

Where can we find you on the web?

All over!

https://www.facebook.com/robertparkerauthor/

https://twitter.com/RobertRParker45

www.robertparkerauthor.com

https://www.instagram.com/robertparkerauthor/

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Andi O’Connor is the award-winning author The Dragonath Chronicles, The Vaelinel Trilogy, and The Legacy of Ilvania. She’s written multiple books, including the critically acclaimed Silevethiel, which is the 2015 Best Indie Book Award winner for Science Fiction/Fantasy, and the 2015 New Apple Official Selection for Young Adult. Silevethiel was also named to Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2013. Andi’s short story collection, Redemption, is a 2014 Kindle Book Awards Semifinalist.

You can frequently find Andi as a ​guest panelist at Comic Cons throughout the country including the Rhode Island Comic Con, Philcon, Conclave, WizardWorld, and Chessiecon. Andi also writes for Niume where she provides writing tips, advice, and insight on her career as an author. You can connect with Andi on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For more information, visit Andi’s website.

About the Book:

Darrak’s adventure concludes with this thrilling finale of The Dragonath Chronicles!  

Following the betrayal of two of his trusted companions and a devastating battle in Mystandia, Darrak’s talents are desperately needed by the citizens of both Earth and Dragonath. Torn with the decision of where his loyalty should remain, he finally decides to confide in Andillrian. Together, they craft a plan they hope will save Darrak’s home planet, but their optimism is short-lived.

The Hellborn’s army has begun the march to war.

With less than two weeks of preparation remaining, their weaknesses become unavoidably apparent. Planning for defeat suddenly becomes as important as planning for victory. Darrak’s insecurities continue until the moment the first arrows begin to fly. He can only hope that help from a few unlikely sources will be enough.

For if they fail, Dragonath will fall.

ORDER YOUR COPY:

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Would you call yourself a born writer?

Definitely! It comes naturally to me! I’ll even let you in on a little secret: I have absolutely no formal training. I’ve never taken a creative writing class in my life or attended any workshops. I’ve had a few authors and an editor (none of whom had read a word of my writing) tell me that I should get formal education in writing because that’s the way it should be done, and I politely said ‘thanks, but no thanks.’

Here’s the thing, I don’t think I need it. Whatever I’m doing is working for me. I have my own style that just came naturally, and I roll with it. I’ve won six awards to date, and the majority of my reviews are positive. I feel like if I took a formal class or workshop, it would screw with whatever is currently going on in my brain, so I’m content to leave well enough alone!

That being said, I don’t want it to sound like I don’t work to improve my writing. I do! Every author should. I just don’t do it in the traditional manners!

What was your inspiration for CALL TO WAR?

Call To War is the third and final book in a series, so the inspiration came from the previous two books in The Dragonath Chronicles. It picks up right where Awakening ended and deals with the main character, Darrak, essentially torn between two worlds. He’s tormented by the fact that he doesn’t truly belong anywhere but not wanting to turn his back on anyone.

There are some great twists and turns in Call To War, and characters’ secrets are finally revealed, making it all the more exciting. The main conflict is the final battle between Darrak’s supporters and the Hellborn who is seeking to destroy Darrak’s bloodline and claim rule over all of Dragonath.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

There is absolutely nothing I refuse to write about, and I have included many controversial topics in my writing such as abortion, religion, rape, abuse, suicide, and global epidemics. Call To War alone deals with rape, abuse, global terrorism, and environmental destruction. I write about these issues because they’re relatable. They’re things that affect many of my readers and can help them think and reflect on their own lives and societies. I’m a huge proponent of talking about and facing issues and learning about both the issues and their consequences. Ignoring something doesn’t make it go away.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

About a year from writing the first word to holding the printed book in front of me.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

You have to be disciplined to be a writer, even if it’s not what you do full-time. It’s easy to get distracted by other things, particularly if you write at home. I write full-time, so a typical day for me starts at 8 in the morning and goes until 6 or 7 at night. I’ll take the morning to work on marketing, promotion, accounting, organizing personal appearances, and preparing for any upcoming events. The afternoons and evenings are set aside for writing or editing, depending on the stage of my work.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

The most difficult thing in writing Call To War was writing the love scene. I’d written rape scenes before, but never a love scene, which was challenging in itself, but the book as a whole is extremely dark and violent, with the characters being in dire situations. A love scene felt right between two of the characters, but writing it, and writing it so it wasn’t out of place with the rest of the story, proved difficult.

What do you love most about being an author?

Touching people in ways I never thought possible. It’s truly incredible to me that my books have helped people get through some of the most difficult times in their lives, and it’s the most rewarding feeling imaginable.

I had one reader write to me saying she had cancer. What got her through her chemotherapy sessions was visualizing my elf city of Silverden from Silevethiel. Every time she went in for treatment, she would picture herself in the world I’d created, and it would help to calm her enough so she could forget where she was and why she was there.

Another woman told me that the relationship between Irewen (a human) and Silevethiel (a lion) perfectly captured the love and friendship she had with her cat. Re-reading scenes from Silevethiel helped her recapture the memory of that bond after her pet’s death.

Hearing such personal stories of how my work has affected people and brought hope into their lives makes being an author tremendously worthwhile. They vanquish all of the frustrations that come with the job and are what make being an author amazing. They’re why I’ll continue to write until my last breath.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

My first book, The Lost Heir, was originally published through a small press. I hated the experience and the amount of control I lost. I have since self-published all of my books, including Call To War, and re-released The Lost Heir under my imprint, Purple Sun Press.

I am extremely happy with my decision to switch to self-publishing; however, it takes a great deal of work and money and can at times be quite frustrating. I essentially follow the process of a traditional publisher and hire editors, a cover designer, a printer, and a distributor so it is done professionally and available to all major stores/retailers, libraries, indie bookstores, and distributors. The best compliment I had when I was still unsure of whether I’d made the correct decision to self-publish was before I’d re-released The Lost Heir. Someone thought that was the self-published book and Silevethiel, the first one I’d actually self-published, was the one that had gone through a traditional publisher. It was at that moment I knew I’d made the right decision.

Where can we find you on the web?

Website: www.andioconnor.net

Twitter: www.twitter.com/oconnorandi

Facebook: www.facebook.com/oconnor.andi

Instagram: www.instagram.com/andi_oconnor

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THe Zombie Game banner 2

What makes thriller authors tick?  We’re happy to have on board Glenn Shephard, author of the thriller novel, The Zombie Game.

Glenn ShepardGlenn’s first novel, Surge, was written while he was still a surgical resident at Vanderbilt. In the following years he wrote The Hart Virus, a one-thousand-page epic about the AIDS crisis, as well as three other novels. In 2012, he created “Dr. Scott James,” his Fugitive-like action-hero. The first volume of the series was The Missile Game, followed shortly afterward by The Zombie Game. Born on a farm in eastern Virginia, Dr. Shepard lives and maintains a thriving surgical practice in Williamsburg.

Visit Glenn’s website at www.glennshepardauthor.com.

About the Book:

ISIS terrorists are plotting to kill the Pope during his visit to America.

The Zombie Game KindleFireTheir plan: Hijack a hospital ship in Haiti, convert it to a missile launcher, and cruise into Miami Harbor, unnoticed.

Their only obstacle: Dr. Scott James is a volunteer on the ship, and he’s recruited a squad of Haitian zombies to stop the attack. But nothing adds up … until the last seven minutes.

MEET JAKJAK, DEAD MAN

Jacques Jacobo, “Jakjak,” is the Haitian Finance Minister’s personal bodyguard. He’s just taken two bullets in the chest trying to stop an assassination attempt on his boss.

SCOTT JAMES, TARGET

Dr. Scott James is a volunteer surgeon on a hospital ship anchored off the coast of earthquake-ravaged Haiti. He’s got his share of personal demons.

OMAR FAROK, MASTERMIND

Omar Farok wants to rule ISIS, and the world. He’s just taken over the hospital ship and converted it into a launch platform for a nuclear strike on Miami.

SANFIA, VODOUN BOKOR

Sanfia is the most powerful Vodoun priestess in Haiti. Omar Farok will pay her big money to turn Dr. James into a zombie.

ELIZABETH, THE WILDCARD

Beautiful Elizabeth is one of the most notorious freelance operatives in the world. She’s come to Haiti to defuse the bomb.

They’re all about to play The Zombie Game.

For More Information

  • The Zombie Game is available at Amazon.
  • Discuss this book at PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads.

The Zombie Game

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Definitely. I write whether I like it or not! I’ve been writing novels for years as a source of enjoyment. I really didn’t think too much about the publishing process until I had amassed an enormous amount of work. Right about that time was when I created the character of Dr. Scott James, and I knew that the game had changed.

What was your inspiration for The Zombie Game?

My inspiration for The Zombie Game was Wade Davis’ true story of story of experimenting with Zombie drugs, The Serpent and The Rainbow. I really loved how he portrayed Zombie-ism in a realistic light. That’s what I have tried to do in my book. Of course I was also deeply inspired by my forays into Haiti after the earthquake. I went there to do volunteer surgery. While I was there I became thoroughly enamored with the people and the culture.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I like to take real stories in the headlines and put an unexpected spin on them. The theme here, I guess you could say, is a regular guy caught up in extraordinary circumstances.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

It takes about six months, from beginning to end. A lot of that is research time. I research as much as I write. Also, there is the thought-time. I spend a lot of time working out the stories in my head. My novels move from one location to another, and quickly, so I have to think a lot about the twists and turns through before I can write them.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I start slowly, whether I like it or not. The early stages are mainly about researching, so it’s hard to produce a lot of pages, regardless of how disciplined I try to be. But as the story progresses and I get more and more research behind me, I speed up and write a lot of pages. It’s not a matter of discipline as much as I have a lot to write about—and I get excited as the book builds to the big explosion at the end (or gun shot, or …)

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

The hardest thing is getting around people’s perception of what a Zombie actually is. A Zombie is a person who has been drugged and perhaps physically conditioned to do whatever their masters suggest. This is hard for people to believe, so I had to be very meticulous in the portrayal of the Zombies in the book.

What do you love most about being an author?

Tough to say. The reviews have warmed my heart. The email and comments by the readers have been really great to see. I would say, though, that the writing itself, especially when I’m near the end, has been the biggest thrill.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I started my own firm, Mystery House Publishing, and hired some talented people to do all of the cover designs, typesetting, editing, what have you. The process is indeed lengthy, though. And expensive. We have ended up spending a lot more time on editing and proofing than I would have ever thought possible. I’ve been pretty happy with the whole thing. We’ve sold about six thousand books so far, and have been on the bestseller list over at Amazon Kindle. We’re building a readership, you can’t really ask for more.

Where can we find you on the web?

http://www.glennshepardauthor.com

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Patricia Yager DelagrangeBorn and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, Patricia attended St. Mary’s College, studied her junior year at the University of Madrid, received a B.A. in Spanish at UC Santa Barbara then went on to get a Master’s degree in Education at Oregon State University. She lives with her husband and two teenage children in Alameda, across the bay from San Francisco, along with two very large chocolate labs, Annabella and Jack. Her Friesian horse Maximus lives in the Oakland hills in a stall with a million dollar view.

Her latest book is the romantic women’s fiction, Moon Over Alcatraz.

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About the Book:

Moon Over AlcatrazTitle: Moon Over Alcatraz
Author: Patricia Yager Delagrange
Publisher: Ravenswood Publishing/Black Hawk
Pages: 308
Genre: Romantic Women’s Fiction

Brandy Chambers was looking forward to the birth of her first child. She and Weston move from San Francisco to the small town of Alameda to start a family, she’s writing her second book, and Weston has a fantastic job working on the Oakland-San Francisco Bay Bridge project. Having this baby would make her already-wonderful life perfect.

But when the baby dies after a difficult birth, Brandy’s perfect life blows up in her face. Stricken with grief, she and Weston pull apart. This new distance leads them both to disaster. Not until a chance encounter with her high school friend, Edward Barnes, does Brandy pull herself together. Brandy and Weston agree to recommit to each other, striving to forgive infidelity and recreate their previous existence.

Everything is once again going according to plan—until Brandy discovers she’s pregnant. While she struggles to cope with this new obstacle, Edward Barnes returns to town and discovers she’s having a baby, while Weston is torn between his love for his wife and his anger at her betrayal. Can Brandy manage to keep her marriage to Weston together? Will Edward be a part of Brandy’s life if she and Weston separate?

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Would you call yourself a born writer?

That’s an interesting question I’ve never thought about. One thing is certain. I loved reading books at an early age. I was perhaps seven or eight years old when my mother enrolled me in the Book of the Month Club. I looked forward to receiving a new book every month and devoured each and every one. That love of reading has never stopped. In 2009 I decided to write a book that I’d love to read. So I went out and bought myself a MacBook, came home and wrote my first novel.

What was your inspiration for Moon Over Alcatraz?

I have two children, a biological son and an adopted daughter. I have never known what it’s like to lose a child and hope I never do. However couples deal with the death of their children every single day. I wanted to take that experience and dig deep and discover how I would feel if it happened to me. That’s how I write all my books. I ask myself “what if” and go from there. I want the reader to feel an emotion when reading my novels. I believe that’s why people read books.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I like to explore problems in a family. I’ve written about adoption, child abduction, death in childbirth, death of a spouse, infidelity, and more. I love to put myself in the place of these people and ask myself what I would do and how I would feel if it were me.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

It takes me about a month to write a novel and perhaps five or six months of editing then I send it to my editor and we go back and forth for another month or so until the book is ready to be published.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day. 

I start writing after I’ve answered e-mails and completed some social media like reading people’s blog posts and Facebook notifications. I’ll write for a couple of hours, stop for lunch, take a rest then continue to write again until my husband gets home for dinner. I might write for another hour in the evening while sort of watching t.v.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book? 

The most difficult was writing about infidelity which I haven’t experienced and writing about losing a child which I also haven’t experienced. But that’s why I write. I ask myself “what if” and go from there. It’s all about the emotions.

What do you love most about being an author?

I love starting a book and creating a character’s personality then putting her in a situation and watching how she deals with it. I don’t write with a strict outline and chapter summaries. My stories unfold based on a theme that runs through the novel on a natural timeline. I write as I see things happen to the characters in their lives –  from a certain point until I reach the end of the story.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision? 

I stopped searching for an agent because I found that if you don’t already have a book published that’s done really well it’s almost impossible to find someone to take you on. However I’ve found small publishers who are interested in my work. When I sent in my novel to Kitty Bullard at Ravenswood Publishing, she liked what I’d written and has published two of my books and will publish a third one in 2016. I receive very personalized attention from Kitty and I think that’s important. An author has a lot of questions while writing and editing and getting ready for publication of a book and Kitty is always right there for me.

Where can we find you on the web?

My website is:

http://www.patriciayagerdelagrange.com

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Heartbound banner

P.I. AlltraineP.I. Alltraine is an award winning poet and author. She has won several international poetry competitions, and her poems have been published in separate anthologies.

She teaches English Language and Literature in London. She earned her degree in BA English from Queen Mary University of London, a Post Graduate Certificate in Education and Master’s in Teaching at the UCL Institute of Education, University of London.

Before moving to London, she lived in the Philippines where she was ensconced in the rich culture encrusted with dark myths and enchanted tales. She draws inspiration from these in her writing. Although she has lived indifferent places and experienced different cultures, she always enjoyed the constancy of writing in her life. Her favourite authors include John Milton, Virginia Woolf and James Joyce.

Her latest book is the YA fantasy romance, Heartbound.

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About the Book:

Petyr has never found it necessary to consider the humans as anything more than distant, inferior beings–until now. They are the cause of the fatal disease that has plagued his realm, taking the lives of too many of his kind. As a future Heartboundleader of a realm in peril, Petyr must find a way to resist and cure the affliction. He must enter the unfamiliar realm, appear to be an ordinary eighteen-year-old human, observe, and learn.

However, things don’t exactly go according to plan. Instead of embarking single-mindedly on his sober mission, Petyr meets an 18-year-old girl who does things to his emotions that he can’t quite fathom or control. Petyr is falling in love, and he almost forgets the gravity his choices have on his entire world. Despite the risk it poses to his life and hers, he wants to know her, and he wants her to know him–and his world.

For More Information

  • Heartbound is available at Amazon.
  • Watch the trailer at YouTube.
  • Discuss this book at PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads.

Heartbound teaser 2

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Writing is something I always knew I could do. When I was at school, some of my friends could sing, some could draw… I could write. I was the editor in chief of the school paper so I edited and wrote news articles, I wrote many of the school plays I performed in, I entered poetry writing competitions and performed spoken word poetry, I wrote the speeches I delivered in oratorical competitions, declamation, debates, etc. At the time, I thought I was doing so many different things, but looking back, everything I chose to do involved writing. When I was writing Heartbound, there were times when I didn’t agree with my characters’ actions, but I couldn’t change anything because it wasn’t my decision anymore. That’s when I realised what being a writer truly meant. Everyone can write a story, but to create a world with a life of its own, that takes a writer.

What was your inspiration for Heartbound?

The story came to me and demanded to be written. I know, I know. That’s the most clichéd answer ever, but writers keep saying it for a reason. It’s hard to describe the impact of a powerful idea. When it hits a writer, it’s no longer a choice. You have to write it, or it will drive you mad. In my case, I was minding my own business, and all of a sudden, there was this image in my head. It hit me so hard that I had to stop what I was doing. I picked up a pen and paper and started to scribble. My husband walked in and found me on the floor with pieces of papers around me. At that point, the outline of Heartbound was completed—chapter by chapter, from beginning to end.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I’m interested in exploring the complexities of what it means to be human, to be alive, to find a resolution between who you’re meant to be and who you want to be, to find the courage to go against the tides, refuse to conform, and fight for something that means everything to you but means nothing to everyone else.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

It took 3 years to complete and edit Heartbound, but since I didn’t have any set deadlines at the time, I only wrote when I could. The actual writing time would probably add up to just a few months.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I’m an English teacher, which is pretty hectic, so I don’t always get to write during term times. I get the bulk of my writing done when I’m on my holiday. Otherwise, I take advantage of the silence I find in the early hours of the morning.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Finding the time to write it.

What do you love most about being an author?

There is such delight in creating a whole world.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

Heartbound is published by a small press called Soul Mate Publishing, New York. It was a very quick process for me. First, I did some research on credible agents and publishers that would be interested in my genre. I randomly picked one from the list, just to see how the process worked and what a rejection letter looked like. Two weeks later, I got a request for the full manuscript, and two weeks after that I was offered a contract. I had a difficult decision to make because I hadn’t really tried anything else at that point. However, from what I heard, querying agents could take months for a reply (even a rejection reply), and even if someone took me on, there was no guarantee they could sell it to a publisher—and I already had a publisher interested. In the end, it made sense to seize the opportunity. I have to say that I made the right choice signing with them. The whole team—from the editors, the cover artists, the authors—have been so accommodating and supportive. I’ve learned so much from Debby, the chief editor. Most importantly, because SMP is not a big corporate publishing machine, I feel like I’ve had a voice in the whole process.

Where can we find you on the web?

I’m building a (spoken word) poetry collection that will hopefully be ready for publication next year. There’s a video performance available for Unmoving, and a few more from the collection should be up soon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2q4JxaN1fw

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/p.i.alltraine

OFFICIAL WEBSITE: http://pialltraine.com

 

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Peer Through Time banner
David T. PenningtonDavid T. Pennington grew up in a small northern California town called Paradise, but his home is in San Francisco. While his associate’s degree in computer programming has helped pay the bills, his bachelor’s degree in psychology has informed his writing. His love of fiction–mainly mysteries, science fiction, and thrillers–is balanced by his fascination with books on futurism, theoretical physics, and cosmology. Peer Through Time is his debut novel.

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About the Book:

Peer Through Time 3Title: Peer Through Time
Author: David T. Pennington
Publisher: Quantaj Publishing
Pages: 371
Genre: Science Fiction
Format: Paperback/Kindle

In 2079, a time travel experiment sends physicist Carmela Akronfleck further back in time than she’d intended. Though she’s still in her small northern California town, the year is 1936 and she must learn to live without the technology she’s come to rely on. Her neurological implants should be dormant, but she receives a cryptic message, periodically accompanied by an audio transmission from the future. It’s the voice of her former psychotherapist, an android named Kass, stating his innocence in a series of murders occurring in 2079.

When Carmela deciphers the code as a hit list, she’s shocked to discover her mother and sister are among the intended targets. Further evidence reveals the killer’s true identity, but the inoperative time portal prevents her from returning to save her family and vindicate Kass.

She considers another option: hunt down the killer’s ancestors and avert his existence without radically changing history. She devises a plan to protect her family, haunted by doubts that she’s becoming the kind of person she’s always loathed—one willing to take another’s life.

For More Information

  • Peer Through Time is available at Amazon.
  • Discuss this book at PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads.

Would you call yourself a born writer?

Yes and no. I wrote stories from a young age, but I didn’t come back around to it until many years into my adulthood.

What was your inspiration for Peer Through Time?

Many things inspired me, but one significant inspiration was when the TV series Lost began its fifth season and finally began exploring time travel in earnest. My passion was sparked and I was inspired to write a time travel novel.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I like to explore cause and effect, friendship, and what it means to be human.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

It took two and a half years.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I’m not as disciplined as I’d like to be, but I plan to get there. A typical writing day for me is squeezing in as much writing as possible in the morning, before other demands take over.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Keeping track of my two timelines was most challenging.

What do you love most about being an author?

I get massive satisfaction in revising. Taking writing of questionable value, and turning it into something meaningful and intriguing, can be a reward in itself.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

I self-published Peer Through Time. The process was overwhelming at first, so much so that I postponed getting started. Once I educated myself on how to present a professional product, I took it step by step and found the process enjoyable. I’m happy with my decision.

Where can we find you on the web?

I blog occasionally on my website, http://davidtpennington.com/, I’m on Facebook nearly every day, https://www.facebook.com/david.pennington.90, and I tweet every now and then. https://twitter.com/davidtaj68

 

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Becky DueBecky Due is the new voice of women’s fiction. She has the courage, honesty and writing style for today’s busy women, and she does not cringe away from hard issues. She will leave you feeling strong, self-confident, independent, and in control of your life.

Her books have won, and been finalists in, several independent competitions including the 2011 National Indie Excellence Awards, 2010 Indie Excellence Awards and the 2009 IPPY Awards.

Her novels are not the same story with different characters; she has the ability to cross genres from light-hearted romance to heart-racing suspense to keep her readers entertained and inspired.

Becky has been a guest on national TV and radio programs, and the subject of numerous newspaper and national magazine articles for empowering women with her books. She has served as a guest speaker at Women’s Resource Centers, Shelters, Colleges and High Schools throughout the United States. Becky has had extensive training at Victim Services, worked the 24-Hour Sexual Assault Crisis-Line and was a Victim’s Advocate where she offered one-on-one assistance and support to rape victims. In 2007, she started Women Going Forward, the first national women’s telephone support group, which ran for almost two years. After receiving much recognition for her books, Becky’s focus turned back to her writing and empowering women with her novels.

Her latest book is the women’s fiction, Traveling for Love: Searching for Self, Hoping for Love.

Visit her website at www.BeckyDue.com.

Connect & Socialize with Becky:

TWITTER | FACEBOOK

 

Traveling for Love lgWould you call yourself a born writer?

Yes. Writing is my life. I didn’t realize that writing was such an important part of me until my late twenties, although there were signs along the way. I wish I had listened to my teachers (and my gut) when I was younger. I remember, in seventh grade, thinking, “Maybe I should be a writer.” I’m not sure why I waited so long, maybe I needed to accumulate some life experiences… and I have. J

What was your inspiration for Traveling for Love: Searching for Self, Hoping for Love?

I hate to admit this, but I wasn’t feeling good about myself in my own marriage so I created Amanda and I went on the journey with her. I wanted to write a romance, something uplifting, but romance novels seem so far from reality.I needed her, as a forty year old, to go through what many of us go through in our twenties. She needed some heartache before discovering who she was and what she really wanted.

What themes do you like to explore in your writing?

I love all topics of women’s issues. I think most women are such nurturing givers that we often forget to take care of ourselves and give back to ourselves. All of my novels cover issues of empowerment, and encourage women to make themselves a priority.

How long did it take you to complete the novel?

Well, because I’m not a multi-tasker, once I know the basics of my storyline and I’m ready to write it, I write. I do nothing else. But like all of my books, Traveling for Love took years of experiences. I loved writing this story, it was a fun and crazy rollercoaster. Fortunately, through the process I learned a lot about myself, my choices and my marriage.

Are you disciplined? Describe a typical writing day.

I was disciplined while writing Traveling for Love, but I have to say, I’m struggling a little with the novel I’m working on now. I took a year off from writing because I was going through some life changes and I’m trying to get back into the swing of things. But typically, on a good writing day, I wake up around four or five in the morning, make coffee and start writing before I have my first sip. I lose all sense of time until around ten o’clock at night when I’m exhausted and force myself to go to bed. On my uninspired days, like what I’m currently going through, I find distractions—I can’t write today; I have to cut back the shrubs, clean the basement or buy a bike—seriously, the excuses I come up with are ridiculous. I do think off days are good for me, and during those days I’m writing in my mind, taking notes, talking into my phone recorder and putting my ring on my other finger to remember some important point I need to make in the story. I’m convinced that I can’t have good writing days if I don’t have a few unproductive writing days.

What did you find most challenging about writing this book?

Amanda, the main character, changed a few times—I changed her age and some of her choices. I wanted her to struggle with love, career and her truth, as so many of us do.In the beginning of the story, which is the ending of her marriage, Amanda doesn’t know who she is or what she wants and it takes her some time, a couple different men and some life experiences to figure that out.

What do you love most about being an author?

I love everything about being an author, even the torturous parts. I love creating stories and I especially love when people read and enjoy my stories. There is nothing better in the world. Though I have many friends, I’m kind of a loner, somewhat introverted. To me finding my passion and becoming an author was all about finding the place where I fit in. Being an author allows me to honor my introspective personality.

Did you go with a traditional publisher, small press, or did you self publish? What was the process like and are you happy with your decision?

It seems I did everything backward. I started by looking for an agent and going the traditional route with my first novel, The Gentlemen’s Club. I had 8 interested agents but they alltold me to have the manuscript professionally edited. I couldn’t afford a professional editor so my book sat on a shelf until I was in a better financial position. A couple years had passed and I didn’t want to start over again, looking for an agent, so I began working with an editor, started my own publishing company, and published several books. Traveling for Love is the first book published by another company. Because of the changing times in publishing, this has been a wonderful move for me. Luckily, I maintain all the rights and can control the price point of the ebooks, which I happily made available for only 99¢. I’ve also published all of my novels on audio; I love to listen to novels while I’m stuck in traffic. Although I have moved toward the eproducts,loving the quick ease of receiving a book I want to read within seconds, my books are available in paperback. I still love to hold a book in my hands. I’ve never been happier with the business side of writing because I’m able to focus on my favorite part—writing.

Where can we find you on the web?

I’m on Twitter and Facebook, I have a website with great information and I also blog empowering, inspiring postsa couple times a week. Oh, and if you join my Facebook page you’ll automatically receive my blog posts and you’re automatically entered to win free books in our monthly giveaway.

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